New In Paperback Jan. 2 - 8

Fiction and nonfiction releases from David Brooks, Bernard Cornwell, Rosamund Lupton and Condoleezza Rice.

The Fort

The Fort: A Novel of the Revolutionary War

by Bernard Cornwell

Paperback, 468 pages, HarperCollins, $14.99, published January 3 2012 | purchase
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  • The Fort
  • A Novel of the Revolutionary War
  • Bernard Cornwell

One of the most popular and prolific historical novelists writing today, Bernard Cornwell looks at a little-known chapter in the American Revolution in his latest novel, The Fort. It's set in the summer of 1779, when the British sent a force of soldiers and ships to occupy Penobscot Bay in what was then Massachusetts (now Maine). And the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, without much consultation with Gen. George Washington and the Continental Army, sent a force of ships and men to kick them out.

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Sister

Sister

by Rosamund Lupton

Paperback, 341 pages, Random House Inc, $14, published December 20 2011 | purchase
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  • Sister
  • Rosamund Lupton

Screenwriter Rosamund Lupton's debut mystery, Sister, was such a hit in the U.K. that it has taken less than a year to arrive in the States. Detective Bee Hemming was raised in London but lives in New York and works in marketing. She's drowsing through life until her younger sister Tess, only 21 and seven months pregnant, goes missing, and Bee must dedicate herself to the case. The result is a pulse-quickening cocktail of science fiction and whodunit shocker.

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The Social Animal

The Social Animal: The Hidden Sources of Love, Character, and Achievement

by David Brooks

Paperback, 430 pages, Random House Inc, $16, published January 3 2012 | purchase
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  • The Social Animal
  • The Hidden Sources of Love, Character, and Achievement
  • David Brooks

David Brooks, a columnist for The New York Times, delivers a giant parable about the power of our unconscious, and suggests that we might improve ourselves and our world by understanding how we really think. He invents two characters, Harold and Erica, whom we follow from childhood to grave, with commentary about how and why these characters behave and believe as they do, based on a dizzying range of philosophy and research. In its attempt to be a theory of everything, The Social Animal is ambitious and entertaining. But it's also messy.

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The Next Decade

The Next Decade: Empire and Republic in a Changing World

by George Friedman

Paperback, 243 pages, Random House Inc, $15.95, published January 10 2012 | purchase
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  • The Next Decade
  • Empire and Republic in a Changing World
  • George Friedman

Geopolitical intelligence expert George Friedman follows up on The Next 100 Years, his best-seller about the "impersonal forces" that shape history in the long term, with a look at the impact of current decision-making, especially by the U.S. government, on the world. Arguing that the U.S. is an "unintended empire" like Britain in 1910, he calls for an end to what he perceives as an American reluctance to engage in global affairs.

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Condoleezza Rice

Condoleezza Rice: A Memoir of My Extraordinary, Ordinary Family and Me

by Condoleezza Rice

Paperback, 319 pages, Random House Childrens Books, $8.99, published January 10 2012 | purchase
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  • Condoleezza Rice
  • A Memoir of My Extraordinary, Ordinary Family and Me
  • Condoleezza Rice

This memoir written for young people finds former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice looking back with candor and affection on her remarkable childhood.

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Charlotte Abbott edits "New in Paperback." A contributing editor for Publishers Weekly, she also leads a weekly chat on books and reading in the digital age every Friday from 4-5 p.m. ET on Twitter. Follow her at @charabbott or check out the #followreader hashtag.

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