New For 2012: 'This Isn't Your Father's Dodge Dart'

  • Dodge unveiled its 2013 Dart at the North American International Auto Show in Detroit this week. The original Dart was in production from 1960-76. This time around, it's being built on a modified platform of one of Fiat's Alfa Romeos. After a 2009 merger between the struggling Chrysler and Italy's fast-growing Fiat, the two are sharing technology and strategy.
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    Dodge unveiled its 2013 Dart at the North American International Auto Show in Detroit this week. The original Dart was in production from 1960-76. This time around, it's being built on a modified platform of one of Fiat's Alfa Romeos. After a 2009 merger between the struggling Chrysler and Italy's fast-growing Fiat, the two are sharing technology and strategy.
    Tony Ding/AP
  • The Dart's new design doesn't have much in common with the vintage version other than its signature wide grill. But the Dart name targets its reputation as a compact, performance-oriented muscle car. The 2013 Dart's 40 mpg fuel efficiency will outperform the old cars, like this 1962 iteration.
    Hide caption
    The Dart's new design doesn't have much in common with the vintage version other than its signature wide grill. But the Dart name targets its reputation as a compact, performance-oriented muscle car. The 2013 Dart's 40 mpg fuel efficiency will outperform the old cars, like this 1962 iteration.
    Rex Gray/Flickr
  • Dodge has a history of reviving old nameplates: In 2008, it also brought back the Challenger, which had been gone since 1983. The car, like the Panther Pink version above, was first produced in 1970. According to Edmunds.com, some mint condition vintage Challengers can sell for $200,000 today.
    Hide caption
    Dodge has a history of reviving old nameplates: In 2008, it also brought back the Challenger, which had been gone since 1983. The car, like the Panther Pink version above, was first produced in 1970. According to Edmunds.com, some mint condition vintage Challengers can sell for $200,000 today.
    Sicnag/Flickr
  • In 2008, Dodge started taking orders for the Challenger again after a 25-year hiatus, and some dealers began offering classic striped paint jobs to echo the original cars' style.
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    In 2008, Dodge started taking orders for the Challenger again after a 25-year hiatus, and some dealers began offering classic striped paint jobs to echo the original cars' style.
    Jerry Lai/AP
  • Ford's Thunderbird became an iconic American car. Production began in 1955 and evolved almost continuously over the years until 1997. At right is the first version; at left is a 1984 model.
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    Ford's Thunderbird became an iconic American car. Production began in 1955 and evolved almost continuously over the years until 1997. At right is the first version; at left is a 1984 model.
    Ray Howard/AP
  • In a 2002 revival of the Thunderbird, Ford harkened back to the smoother, classic shape of its original hit car to capitalize on its nostalgia factor. The new model didn't sell as well as the company hoped, and the line was discontinued in 2005.
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    In a 2002 revival of the Thunderbird, Ford harkened back to the smoother, classic shape of its original hit car to capitalize on its nostalgia factor. The new model didn't sell as well as the company hoped, and the line was discontinued in 2005.
    AFP/Getty Images
  • The Chevrolet Camaro first went on sale in September 1966 as a response to Ford's popular Mustang. It evolved through four generations before GM stopped production in 2002.
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    The Chevrolet Camaro first went on sale in September 1966 as a response to Ford's popular Mustang. It evolved through four generations before GM stopped production in 2002.
    MCT/Landov
  • But in 2010, the struggling car company revived the model for a fifth generation. Although the Chevy Camaro still hasn't caught up to the Mustang in overall sales, the fifth generation model outsold Ford's muscle car in 2011.
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    But in 2010, the struggling car company revived the model for a fifth generation. Although the Chevy Camaro still hasn't caught up to the Mustang in overall sales, the fifth generation model outsold Ford's muscle car in 2011.
    Charles Rex Arbogast/AP

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Between 1960 and 1976, the Dodge Dart was one of the best-selling cars in America, with its affordable price and rugged styling. More than 3.5 million Darts were sold.

Though the car was never known for being especially stylish or pretty, Chrysler is now reviving the name as the company continues its own revitalization. On Monday, it unveiled the new Dart at the 2012 North American Auto Show in Detroit.

The unveiling of a new car is the part executives really love. First there's a preamble — they usually talk about history — then they talk about turbo chargers and torque and horsepower.

"The days of sacrificing horsepower for fuel economy and vice versa are long gone," Reid Bigland, Dodge brand president and CEO, tells the crowd. "Today you have to have both, and we do."

Next comes the big reveal: As intense music blares, the car zooms on stage, right up to the audience and reporters.

Chryslers sells lots of big SUVs and sedans, and it hasn't been competitive in the small car market. But because of the bailout, Chrysler agreed to sell a fuel-efficient small car that's made in America.

The new Dodge Dart is built on the platform of one of Fiat's Alpha Romeos, though Chrysler stretched it a bit to fit us larger Americans. While the old Dart sat six, this one is a compact car that fits five uncomfortably.

Bigland says most people younger than 35 don't even remember the original Dodge Dart, but those over 35 remember it fondly. Aaron Bragman, a senior analyst at IHS Automotive who falls into the latter age group, says this is definitely not your father's Dodge Dart.

"The old Dodge Dart is really one of the vehicles you think of when you think of a '60s American car," Bragman says. "It was big, rear-wheel drive, it had room inside for six. ... It is nothing like the car we see in front of us."

Bragman says the new Dart is a sign of a real change in the culture of the U.S. car industry.

"They were happy to cede the passenger-car market — mid-size cars, compact cars — to Japanese competitors, and Japanese brands basically took over the American market," Bragman says. "They sold far more than the Americans do. Well, apparently the Americans are no longer content with that, and they're introducing passenger cars of their own that are easily as good, if not better than, many of their competitors."

Bragman and other analysts say if the Americans don't continue to stay competitive in the small car market, they won't be selling cars globally — or in the U.S. for that matter.

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