U.S. Crowns New Largest Beermaker

The brewer of Yuengling based in Pottsville, Pa., is now the largest American beermaker. Other popular beers like Bud are now owned by foreign companies. Yuengling shipments grew last year to about 2.5 million barrels, edging out the maker of Samuel Adams.

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RENEE MONTAGNE, BYLINE: And today's last word in business is Yuengling. The brewer of that beer, based in Pottsville, Pennsylvania, is now the largest American beer maker. And if you're thinking how could Yuengling beat out all-American brews like Bud or Miller Lite? Well, the maker of Budweiser, Anheuser Busch, is now owned by a Belgian Brazilian company, and Miller Lite is part of the London-based multinational SAB Miller. New figures first sighted in the Allentown, Pennsylvania Morning Call newspaper show that Yuengling shipments grew last year to about 2.5 million barrels, edging out Boston beer, which makes Samuel Adams.

And that's the business news on MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

I'm surprised we don't have Renee, a reporter who's named Yuengling. That sounds like a good NPR name me.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

INSKEEP: I'm George Yuengling in Boston. Actually, I'm Steve Inskeep.

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