China Advertises Red Pad Which Looks Like An iPad

The Wall Street Journal picked up on the device, which was advertised briefly in China's state media. It offered web content for the party faithful. The device however was apparently priced at more than $1,500. China's online community launched scathing attacks about the Red Pad, saying only corrupt bureaucrats using public funds could afford such a thing.

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Today's last word in business comes from China, and the word is: Red Pad.

It's a device that looks a lot like an iPad, except it's red in color and in ideological purity.

The Wall Street Journal picked up on the device, which was advertised briefly in China's state media. It offered Web content for the party faithful, like quick access to the Communist Party's mouthpiece, the People's Daily. The device however, was apparently priced at more than $1,500 - good deal more than an iPad.

China's online community launched scathing attacks about the Red Pad, saying only corrupt bureaucrats using public funds could afford such a thing. And the ads for the device have since disappeared - capitalism with Chinese characteristics.

That's the business news on MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

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