Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!

Opening Panel Round

Our panelists answer questions about the week's news: Haunting Facebook.

Copyright © 2012 NPR. For personal, noncommercial use only. See Terms of Use. For other uses, prior permission required.

PETER SAGAL, HOST:

Right now, panel, time for you to answer some questions about this week's news. Faith, you can update your Facebook at your computer, in the bathroom, even while driving through a school zone. Well, a new app just out will allow you to post a status update even when you are what?

FAITH SALIE: Gosh, what's worse than doing it while you're going to the bathroom? Giving birth.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

MO ROCCA: No, I bet I know what it is.

SAGAL: Status: aahhh.

SALIE: Dying.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Even more than dying.

SALIE: Oh, when you're dead.

SAGAL: Yes, indeed.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

SAGAL: Don't work Facebook fans, just because you've died doesn't mean you have to boring your friends on Facebook.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

ROCCA: I'm decomposing.

SAGAL: Well, the new app is called If I Die, which really should be called When I Die.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: It allows you to compose a final message that will be posted after your ultimate demise. It's already a success, though a large of the submitted final messages are just, "Look at the lunch I would have been eating today if I were alive."

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

ROCCA: Wow, and how long can this go on for?

SAGAL: I don't know. But the real question is how does the app know that you've died?

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: And the answer is it just knows. If you haven't checked your Facebook page...

ROCCA: In five minutes.

SAGAL: ...for 45 minutes.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: You must be dead.

(SOUNDBITE OF APPLAUSE)

ROCCA: Wow, what if you could have - sorry, this is so - well, it is a morbid topic, so there's no way not to be morbid about it, but if you could bring, like, your iPhone into the casket and it could hear what people are saying when they come to your gravesite, and post that. Like, through some voice recognition thing?

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

ROCCA: You know what I'm saying?

SAGAL: Yeah.

ROCCA: Like, "you know I actually never really liked him that much." You know, like three weeks later.

TOM BODETT: The technology is there.

SAGAL: You can imbed it in the gravestone.

ROCCA: Yes.

SAGAL: People could - yeah.

ROCCA: That would be great.

SAGAL: Yeah.

BODETT: I would just say "I heard that."

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

ROCCA: An automatic response.

(SOUNDBITE OF APPLAUSE)

SALIE: That was good.

ROCCA: An automatic response, that's great.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

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