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Sen. Rand Paul Refuses TSA Pat-Down

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Sen. Rand Paul Refuses TSA Pat-Down

Sen. Rand Paul Refuses TSA Pat-Down

Sen. Rand Paul Refuses TSA Pat-Down

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The senator was delayed at the Nashville airport Monday. An alarm went off as he passed through security. He asked to be re-screened but was told he'd have to undergo a pat-down. Paul declined. He's the son of Rep. Ron Paul (R-Texas).

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And our last word in business today is a pat-down throwdown. The Transportation Safety Administration says it did not detain Kentucky Senator Rand Paul. But officials at the agency did stop one of their most outspoken critics while he was going through the airport security line in Nashville yesterday.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

The Republican senator was going through a body scanner when the alarm went off. Apparently, it was an anomaly. Then, he refused to submit to a pat-down, so he was escorted out of the screening area.

The TSA says it is a routine procedure when passengers refuse to complete the screening.

GREENE: The senator missed his flight, and his father was also upset. House Representative - and presidential candidate - Ron Paul repeated his promise to get rid of the TSA if he is elected.

And that is the business news here on MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm David Greene.

MONTAGNE: And I'm Renee Montagne.

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