Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!

Panel Round Two

More questions for the panel: Mr. or Mrs. Meat, A Cereal Killer, Brides-to-be ... to-be, and Lord Grantham is Not Amused.

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CARL KASELL: From NPR and WBEZ-Chicago, this is WAIT WAIT...DON'T TELL ME!, the NPR News quiz. I'm Carl Kasell. We're playing this week with Brian Babylon, Roxanne Roberts and Peter Grosz. And here again is your host, at the Chase Bank Auditorium in downtown Chicago, Peter Sagal.

PETER SAGAL, HOST:

Thank you, Carl. Thank you so much.

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SAGAL: In just a minute, Carl investigates Mitt Rhyme-ney's tax returns in our Listener Limerick Challenge.

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SAGAL: If you'd like to play, give us a call, 1-888-Wait-Wait, that's 1-888-924-8924. Right now, panel, some more questions for you from the week's news.

Peter, we all know foodies are concerned with where their meat was raised and what it was fed and how it lived and if it was comfortable, you know. Well now, restaurants report more and more diners want to know what about their meat?

PETER GROSZ: Who its parents were?

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SAGAL: It has to come from a good family.

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GROSZ: Yeah, with breeding, in addition to all that stuff. They want to know - let's see, is it along those lines? It's more of that...

SAGAL: No, no, I'll give you a hint. They're trying to decide whether they should use a pink napkin or a blue napkin.

GROSZ: Oh, if it was male or female?

SAGAL: Yeah, that's apparently a big concern, male or female.

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SAGAL: They want to know the gender of their entrée.

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SAGAL: Now, there are certain meats that you know the sex of. There's Rocky Mountain oysters.

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SAGAL: Skirt steak.

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SAGAL: But you don't always know if your chicken was a hen or rooster or if your hamburger enjoyed Vin Diesel movies.

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SAGAL: Or if the pig you're eating was paid, on average, 17 percent less than its male counterpart.

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SAGAL: The theory is that hormones differ between male and female animals and it makes for a slight difference in taste. You know, so many restaurants are asking if they want a same sex or traditional relationship with their lunch.

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ROXANNE ROBERTS: Well, wait.

BRIAN BABYLON: Is that true?

SAGAL: That's true.

ROBERTS: Wait.

GROSZ: You know, snobby people can ruin food so quickly.

SAGAL: Yeah, I know.

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GROSZ: It's unbelievable.

ROBERTS: Now, this is just a technical question.

SAGAL: Yeah.

ROBERTS: But are chicken breasts...

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SAGAL: I don't think it matters.

BABYLON: I've been eating man chicken breasts this whole time?

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SAGAL: You're so disappointed.

GROSZ: Wait a minute. How excited were you to eat female chicken breasts?

BABYLON: That's what I though was going on.

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SAGAL: Brian, kids love Tony the Tiger, the Trix Rabbit, all those fun mascots. Well, some opposed to the marketing of sugary cereals to children are protesting with what?

BABYLON: Like some type of boycott.

SAGAL: Well, it's a version of Tony the Tiger that is what?

BABYLON: Yeah, but he's in shape.

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BABYLON: Oh, that guy was in shape the last time.

SAGAL: Well the original Tony the Tiger is pretty buff.

BABYLON: He was pretty buff. I'm sorry.

SAGAL: I'll give you a hint, it's grrrreatly fattening.

BABYLON: Fat Tony the Tiger.

SAGAL: A Fat Tony the Tiger, yes.

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BABYLON: Yeah.

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SAGAL: Ever wondered what Tony the Tiger would look like if he actually ate the breakfast cereal he sells?

ROBERTS: I don't know, it's the stripes that make him look fat.

SAGAL: That's right.

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SAGAL: Well artist Ron English's new Fat Tony is about four times the normal size, he carries a lot of the weight in the belly.

BABYLON: He reads comic books.

SAGAL: He does. He doesn't get a lot of exercise. English hopes that Fat Tony the Tiger will make kids more aware of the dangers of eating all that sugary cereal. But sadly, all it seems to have done is to create a new market for out of shape cereal mascots.

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SAGAL: Instead of a ship, Captain Crunch now has a mobility scooter.

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SAGAL: And Snap, Crackle and Pop are now Listless, Diabetic and Clutching His Chest.

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GROSZ: Tucan Sam can barely get off the ground.

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SAGAL: Oh.

GROSZ: Well that's what Grimace is. Grimace is just like kids...

BABYLON: What is Grimace?

GROSZ: ...you might look like this one day.

SAGAL: Yeah.

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GROSZ: Swollen and purple and you barely see your feet.

SAGAL: Peter, as you know, the wedding planning industry is huge, and according to "Good Morning America," a number of companies are now helping women plan their perfect day, even if they don't have what?

GROSZ: A fiancé?

SAGAL: Exactly right.

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SAGAL: Planning a wedding before you have a boyfriend...

BABYLON: Is crazy.

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ROBERTS: Wait, wait, wait, no, you know what that is?

SAGAL: What is that, Roxanne?

ROBERTS: It's in the American tradition. It's pre-engaged.

SAGAL: Yeah, pre-engaged.

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SAGAL: No, what it is, planning a wedding without a groom is both a hot new trend, apparently, and it's the worst possible hobby to mention in your Okay Cupid profile.

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SAGAL: Roxanne, PBS is in legal trouble with the makers of the hugely popular "Downton Abbey" miniseries for doing what without their permission?

ROBERTS: I need a hint. I don't know.

SAGAL: Well, is that a real Lord Grantham belly ring?

ROBERTS: Merchandising.

SAGAL: Yes.

ROBERTS: Trashy.

SAGAL: Yes.

ROBERTS: Non period specific.

SAGAL: Yes.

ROBERTS: Memorabilia.

SAGAL: Yes.

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SAGAL: Very good.

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SAGAL: Well what they're doing is they're selling knockoff jewelry named for the show's characters. So if you want the "Lady Mary Pearl Necklace and Earring Set," you better hurry because PBS apparently never got permission to sell the Edwardian jewelry from the producers of the series.

But the question here isn't so much what was PBS thinking in doing this and sort of jumping the gun legally, so much as what was your boyfriend thinking when he bought you a necklace from PBS?

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SAGAL: Here honey, I got this for you from PBS because you, too, make me feel like I'm 20 years older than I actually am.

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GROSZ: Yeah. When you wear this necklace, you look like Maggie Smith.

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SAGAL: Yeah, yeah, every girl wants to.

GROSZ: Wait, why are you mad at me, I bought you a necklace?

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