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TSA Cracks Down On Agents Who Steal From Flyers

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TSA Cracks Down On Agents Who Steal From Flyers

Business

TSA Cracks Down On Agents Who Steal From Flyers

TSA Cracks Down On Agents Who Steal From Flyers

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/146330415/146330431" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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The Transportation Security Administration says it has zero tolerance for agents who steal from passengers. At New York's JFK airport on Thursday, police say an agent was caught stealing $5,000 from a passenger's jacket as it was going through the X-ray conveyor belt.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And our last word in business today highlights a different part of the flying experience. The word is zero tolerance.

That's the Transportation Security Administration policy on agents stealing from passengers, which has been happening a lot lately, and it's not helping the image of an agency that many people already love to hate.

Yesterday, at New York's JFK Airport, police say an agent was caught stealing $5,000 from a passenger's jacket as it was going through the X-ray conveyor belt. And last month, a TSA agent at Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport was suspended after stealing an iPad from someone's checked luggage. The owner of the iPad used the tracking feature on the device to locate it at the agent's home, where seven other iPads were found.

And that's the business news on MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

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