Letters: On Aleksey Igudesman And Hyung-ki Joo

Melissa Block and Robert Siegel read emails from listeners about violinist Aleksey Igudesman and pianist Hyung-ki Joo.

Copyright © 2012 NPR. For personal, noncommercial use only. See Terms of Use. For other uses, prior permission required.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And now, time for your letters, which take us back to my interview on Monday with violinist Aleksey Igudesman and pianist Hyung-ki Joo - especially the ending of that interview.

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SIEGEL: Aleksey Igudesman and Hyung-ki Joo, thank you both very much.

HYUNG-KI JOO: Thank you very much.

ALEKSEY IGUDESMAN: Thank you. Thank You.

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SIEGEL: You're listening to ALL...

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

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SIEGEL: Igudesman and Joo are conservatory-trained musicians who believe that classical music should be fun. And they clearly convinced many of you.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

LOL, writes Harold Cohen of Windsor, Connecticut: You should have included a warning to those of us driving and listening. I was laughing so hard that I had to slow down.

SIEGEL: And Dennis Ceballos, of Stockton, California, also may have put himself and other drivers in danger. He writes: I laughed so much when I was driving home, I broke out in an asthmatic cough.

BLOCK: Well, as you heard, one of Igudesman and Joo's jokes includes the never-ending ending of a classical performance. Sharon Pearce of Alexandria, Virginia, said that reminded her of an NPR pledge drive.

Pearce writes: Just when you think they're wrapping up and you might get back to ALL THINGS CONSIDERED, they repeat that 800 number one more time - and make another plea for a sustaining membership - and remind you how much you love NPR, and why you should give.

SIEGEL: Well, more of you were reminded of something else: a very similar musical joke.

BLOCK: Daniel Porter, also of Alexandria, Virginia, writes that he wants to give credit where credit is due. Dudley Moore, he writes, performed almost the exact, same never-ending-finale bit way back in late '50s.

SIEGEL: Well, here's Moore from a live performance in the early 1960s.

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BLOCK: As Moore attempts to ends his piece, we'll end this Letters segment.

SIEGEL: That's right. Keep sending those letters.

BLOCK: We love to hear from you.

SIEGEL: Just go to NPR.org, and click on Contact Us.

BLOCK: Or you can write us a letter.

SIEGEL: To NPR - or formally known as National Public Radio.

BLOCK: You can send us an email, check out our Twitter feed, like us of Facebook.

SIEGEL: Or just yell out the window...

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SIEGEL: ..and one of us might hear you.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

(SOUNDBITE OF PIANO MUSIC)

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER, APPLAUSE)

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