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Opening Pane Round

Opening Pane Round

Opening Pane Round
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Our panelists answer questions about the week's news: Downton Blabby.

PETER SAGAL, HOST:

Right now, panel, it's time for you to answer some questions about this week's news. Peter, this week NPR News unleashed its powerful investigative reporters on a scandal in the media. What was it?

PETER GROSZ: I don't now. About me needing a hint to answer this question?

SAGAL: No.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Well, for example, they're pretty sure Lady Mary should not have described the flower show as "totally rad."

GROSZ: I don't watch "Downton Abbey," but is it "Downton Abbey"?

SAGAL: It was "Downton Abbey." Specifically, it's the anachronisms in "Downton Abbey," because the show is known for its attention to historical detail, but linguist Ben Zimmer, interviewed on MORNING EDITION, pointed out the characters use phrases that came about after the 19-teens setting. For example, "I'm just saying."

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: "Step on it." Nobody said step on it back then. And the Dowager Countess' reference to Linsanity.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

MO ROCCA: I love this. This is NPR beating up PBS. It's nerd on nerd violence.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

(SOUNDBITE OF APPLAUSE)

GROSZ: You know what they're doing? They're beating them up with - they're taking their tote bags and smashing...

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

ROCCA: And smacking, it's crazy.

GROSZ: Smashing back with their coffee mugs.

SAGAL: One of the most egregious anachronisms on the show was when World War I starts and Lady Mary says "World War I just started."

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

KYRIE O'CONNOR: No.

ROCCA: Did she just say - no.

GROSZ: She says this'll be the war to end all wars.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

ROCCA: Oh right, that's very funny. She wouldn't have known it was World War I. Sorry, it took me a while.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

(SOUNDBITE OF APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: Mo Rocca, ladies and gentlemen.

(SOUNDBITE OF APPLAUSE)

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

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