NPR logo

Sotheby's To Auction Munch's 'The Scream'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/147247317/147247490" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Sotheby's To Auction Munch's 'The Scream'

Business

Sotheby's To Auction Munch's 'The Scream'

Sotheby's To Auction Munch's 'The Scream'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/147247317/147247490" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

One of four versions of "The Scream" by Norwegian artist Edvard Munch is going on the block this spring. All four versions of the painting show a man clutching the sides of his skull-shaped head, his mouth open. The one being offered by Sotheby's is the last still in private hands.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And today's last word in business is: Final sale.

One of the most famous paintings in art history, a version of "The Scream" by the Norwegian artist Edvard Munch is going on the block this spring. They're four versions of "The Scream," all show a figure clutching the sides of the head, mouth open. The one being offered by Sotheby's is the last that is still in private hands. It's owned by a Norwegian businessman whose father was a friend of the painter.

You may scream at the price. The pastel composition is expected to fetch at least $80 million.

And that's the business news on MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

Copyright © 2012 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.

We no longer support commenting on NPR.org stories, but you can find us every day on Facebook, Twitter, email, and many other platforms. Learn more or contact us.