Legends Participate In White House Blues Night

As part of Black History Month, President and Mrs. Obama hosted a musical celebration of the blues Tuesday night. Guests included legends like B.B. King and Mick Jagger.

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RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Now, to a less controversial collaboration. Last night, the president and first lady hosted a blues night at the White House. They were marking Black History Month, and guests included legends B.B. King, and also newcomers like Trombone Shorty.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Not to mention, Mick Jagger and Buddy Guy, who nudged the president to join the band for an impromptu guest vocal.

BUDDY GUY: I heard you singing Al Green. So you done started something. You gotta keep it up now.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

MONTAGNE: Buddy Guy was referring to the president's rendition of a few phrases of an Al Green song last month at a rally in Harlem.

INSKEEP: After hearing that challenge last night, the president took a microphone from Mick Jagger.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "SWEET HOME CHICAGO")

PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA: (Singing) Baby, don't you want to go.

(SOUNDBITE OF CHEERING)

B.B. KING: (Singing) Same old place.

OBAMA: (Singing) Sweet home, Chicago.

(SOUNDBITE OF CHEERING)

INSKEEP: A surprise performance from President Obama, with a little help from B.B. King.

MONTAGNE: The full concert airs on PBS next week.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "SWEET HOME CHICAGO")

SINGERS: (Singing) Come on. Baby don't you want to go.

INSKEEP: This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News.

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