Barber Poles Are In The Middle Of A Hair-Cut Debate

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Barbers and beauticians are splitting hairs over an iconic image: the swirling red, white and blue striped pole that often stands outside a barber shop. Barbers in several states are proposing legislation to prevent shops without a licensed barber from using the striped pole.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And today's last word in business is: barbershop battle.

Barbers and beauticians are splitting hairs over the swirling red, white and blue striped pole that traditionally stands outside a barber shop. Barbers in several states are pushing legislation to prevent shops without a licensed barber from using the striped pole.

Many hair stylists say that they offer the same services as a licensed barber. But barbers say there are differences. For instance, only they can give shaves with a straight razor.

Some states are even proposing fines. They're already in effect in Ohio and extend to pet grooming facilities, which can be fined up to $500 for using the pole. Quite a haircut, that would be, for giving a haircut.

That's the business news on MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep.

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