For Suspect In Afghan Attack, A Praised Record

Staff Sgt. Robert Bales (left), the U.S. soldier who allegedly shot and killed 16 civilians in Afghanistan, at the National Training Center in Fort Irwin, Calif., on Aug. 23. i i

Staff Sgt. Robert Bales (left), the U.S. soldier who allegedly shot and killed 16 civilians in Afghanistan, at the National Training Center in Fort Irwin, Calif., on Aug. 23. Defense Video and Imagery Distribution System/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Defense Video and Imagery Distribution System/AFP/Getty Images
Staff Sgt. Robert Bales (left), the U.S. soldier who allegedly shot and killed 16 civilians in Afghanistan, at the National Training Center in Fort Irwin, Calif., on Aug. 23.

Staff Sgt. Robert Bales (left), the U.S. soldier who allegedly shot and killed 16 civilians in Afghanistan, at the National Training Center in Fort Irwin, Calif., on Aug. 23.

Defense Video and Imagery Distribution System/AFP/Getty Images

Profile Of The Suspect

Name: Robert Bales

Age: 38

Family: Married, two children

Military Service: Staff sergeant assigned to the 2nd Battalion, 3rd Infantry Regiment of the 3rd Stryker Brigade Combat Team, of the 2nd Infantry Division based out of Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Wash. Attended sniper school in 2008.

Deployment History:
Iraq: Nov. 1, 2003 - Oct. 1, 2004
Iraq: June 19, 2006 - Sept. 22, 2007
Iraq: Aug. 8, 2009 - June 4, 2010
Afghanistan: Dec. 1, 2011 - March 2012

Awards And Medals: Received an Army Superior Unit Award, an Expert Infantry Badge and six Army Commendation Medals, among others.

Education: Associate degree, 1992

Criminal Record: Arrested in 2002 for assault; he pleaded not guilty and the case was dismissed. In 2009, he was cited for a hit-and-run in a single-car accident.

-NPR Staff, U.S. Army and The Associated Press

There is still only sketchy information available about Staff Sgt. Robert Bales' recent experience in Afghanistan, but five years ago in Iraq, he was considered an excellent and upbeat soldier.

Bales is suspected of killing 16 unarmed Afghan civilians last Sunday. He has yet to be charged, and his civilian lawyers say they will meet with him at Fort Leavenworth, Kan., to learn the facts of the case.

Friends and neighbors describe Bales as a dedicated husband and father, and they keep mentioning his "sunny" disposition. Bales' fellow soldiers tell the same story. Capt. Chris Alexander, Bales' platoon leader in Iraq, says he "always kind of had a smile on his face."

Saving Lives In Iraq

Alexander and Bales were in Iraq in 2006 and 2007, during the troop surge. Bales headed up a "fire team," a subunit in one of Alexander's squads.

"He was one of those guys that can just kind of joke around during downtime," Alexander says, and then get down to business when it was necessary.

They were part of a Stryker Brigade, deployed from Washington state's Fort Lewis. The Strykers are eight-wheel vehicles that are armored for combat, but still nimble enough for the tight quarters of urban warfare. Alexander says the vehicle's armor caused some soldiers to get complacent about keeping an eye out — but not Bales. One day in the city of Mosul, his attentiveness saved lives.

"A guy popped around the corner with a [rocket-propelled grenade]... [Bales] saw it right away before the guy launched, and he actually hit the guy and caused the round to go high, so it missed all of us," Alexander says.

Bales was decorated for good conduct, but he never received a medal for valor. He was nominated for one, after the Battle of Najaf in January of 2007, by Maj. Brent Clemmer, then captain.

'Always Positive'

Stationed in Washington, Clemmer has known about Bales' alleged role in the massacre for almost a week now, but he's been reluctant to talk to the news media. He agreed to talk to NPR if he wasn't recorded.

Then-Capt. Brent Clemmer said Staff Sgt. Robert Bales distinguished himself as a team leader in Clemmer's C Company, 2nd Battalion, 3rd Infantry Regiment during the Battle of Zarqa, Iraq. The faces of the rest of Bales' squad have been obscured. i i

Then-Capt. Brent Clemmer said Staff Sgt. Robert Bales distinguished himself as a team leader in Clemmer's C Company, 2nd Battalion, 3rd Infantry Regiment during the Battle of Zarqa, Iraq. The faces of the rest of Bales' squad have been obscured. Courtesy Maj. Brent Clemmer hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy Maj. Brent Clemmer
Then-Capt. Brent Clemmer said Staff Sgt. Robert Bales distinguished himself as a team leader in Clemmer's C Company, 2nd Battalion, 3rd Infantry Regiment during the Battle of Zarqa, Iraq. The faces of the rest of Bales' squad have been obscured.

Then-Capt. Brent Clemmer said Staff Sgt. Robert Bales distinguished himself as a team leader in Clemmer's C Company, 2nd Battalion, 3rd Infantry Regiment during the Battle of Zarqa, Iraq. The faces of the rest of Bales' squad have been obscured.

Courtesy Maj. Brent Clemmer

He recalls Bales as "a really good" non-commissioned officer and "one of those guys who was always positive." He underscores that point with a snapshot of Bales' unit. In a group of soldiers posed around a Stryker vehicle, Bales is the guy in the middle with the biggest grin.

His old platoon leader, Alexander, says he's heard the theory that Bales may have "snapped," but he says that's hard for him to picture.

"He had about the same stress level as any of the rest of us, and he seemed to handle it very well," he says.

Post-Traumatic Stress?

Still, that was 2007. Since then, a lot has happened to Bales. On his third Iraq tour, he was injured. He lost part of a foot and suffered an unspecified traumatic brain injury. Back in the U.S., he failed to get a promotion he'd been hoping for. Then he was told he had to go on a fourth combat deployment, this time to Afghanistan.

"I've talked to people who have done both Iraq and Afghanistan, and they say they'd pick Iraq any day of the week because Afghanistan is just so brutal," Alexander says. "Something just finally — his glass filled up, and that was it."

That's already shaping up as a possible legal defense. On Thursday, Bales' civilian lawyer made a point of introducing reporters to a psychiatrist who's made a career testifying about post-traumatic stress disorder in court.

But for many, that explanation isn't sufficient. One week on, Clemmer says he still can't get his head around the idea that Bales killed those civilians. He adds, "You can't forgive it if he did it."

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and terms of use, and will be moderated prior to posting. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.