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Apple Tries To Clear Up Problems In China

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Apple Tries To Clear Up Problems In China

Business

Apple Tries To Clear Up Problems In China

Apple Tries To Clear Up Problems In China

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/149443411/149409057" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Apple CEO Tim Cook has flown in to China to meet with government leaders. He's trying to work out issues ranging from trademark concerns to treatment of local factory workers who make Apple products.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with Apple's China trouble.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

GREENE: Apple CEO Tim Cook has flown to China to meet with government leaders. He's trying to clear up problems ranging from trademark issues to treatment of local Apple workers. Apple has a lot at stake in China.

The country is the technology firm's most important manufacturing hub, as well as its biggest potential market. Still, as of 2011, the iPhone was just the fifth most popular smartphone in China. Apple does not have a deal with China's biggest mobile carrier. Analysts say that's because of compatibility issues.

And the new iPad has not been released in China, partly due to a legal battle with a Chinese firm over the iPad trademark. So far Cook has no plans to meet with representatives from that company to resolve the dispute.

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