Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!

Panel Round Two

More questions for the panel: Good News For the Jolly Green Giant, What's In An Unappetizing Name and Somebody Needs A Drink.

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CARL KASELL: From NPR and WBEZ-Chicago, this is WAIT WAIT...DON'T TELL ME!, the NPR News quiz. I'm Carl Kasell. We're playing this week with Brian Babylon, Paula Poundstone and Maz Jobrani. And here again is your host, at the Chase Bank Auditorium in downtown Chicago, Peter Sagal.

PETER SAGAL, HOST:

Thank you, Carl.

(SOUNDBITE OF APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: In just a minute, Carl asks McDonald's to stop using pink shryme in their burgers in our Listener Limerick Challenge. If you'd like to play, give us a call at 1-888-Wait-Wait, that's 1-888-924-8924. Right now, panel, some more questions for you from the week's news.

Paula, the Supreme Court hearings this week looked like bad news for Obamacare, but it seemed to be very good for what industry? Makers of what?

PAULA POUNDSTONE: Geez, I have no idea.

SAGAL: Well, it was because Justice Scalia kept saying everybody would be forced to eat it.

POUNDSTONE: Oh, was it big for broccoli?

SAGAL: It was big for broccoli, yes.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

SAGAL: It was the biggest week for broccoli in a long time.

POUNDSTONE: I'm so happy for them.

(SOUNDBITE OF APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: Critics of Obamacare say that if the government has the right to make you buy health insurance, it has the right to make you do anything and the example they always use is the right to make you eat broccoli. And apparently, the fear of a Federal Broccoli Enforcement Agency has made it to the Supreme Court, where Justice Scalia first raised the specter of a broccoli mandate.

BRIAN BABYLON: Is that a bad thing? I mean, roughage, is that bad?

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Well, no, it's not bad for you, but maybe a government that forced you to eat it would be.

BABYLON: Well, it depends on if they're smashed into my mouth, that's not good.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

BABYLON: I mean if they're giving me, you know, dainty bites, I'm okay with that.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

POUNDSTONE: And just the tops. You want just the tops.

BABYLON: Yeah, I don't like the chunk part. Yuck.

POUNDSTONE: Yeah.

MAZ JOBRANI: My boy is the same. Why is it nobody likes the bottoms?

BABYLON: Because I'm a giant and I'm eating trees.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

(SOUNDBITE OF APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: Legal issues aside, broccoli growers are enjoying the attention their product is now getting. And this will pave the way to future product placement in the Supreme Court.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: So Justice Scalia will be like, if they can make you buy health insurance, what's to stop them from making you buy the 2012 Nissan Versa?

POUNDSTONE: Oh man.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Maz, you probably heard about the recent uproar about pink slime and the ammonia treated beef filler that's been showing up in hamburger meat. Well now the makers of pink slime are reacting to the negative publicity by doing what?

JOBRANI: Dying the slime a different color?

SAGAL: No.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Well it's like a horrible meat like product by any other name still smells as gross.

JOBRANI: Oh, so they're giving it another name.

SAGAL: Yes, they're calling it something else is what they're going to do.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

JOBRANI: Plime.

SAGAL: Yes.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Lean finely textured beef.

JOBRANI: Oh, la, la.

SAGAL: That's what they want you to call it.

POUNDSTONE: Oh wow.

BABYLON: Lean what?

SAGAL: The company says that that's what it's called. It's called lean finely textured beef. It's made by Beef Products Incorporated.

POUNDSTONE: Well who started calling it pink slime?

SAGAL: An FDA inspector referred to it as pink slime.

BABYLON: Is it gluten free?

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: I don't know.

(SOUNDBITE OF APPLAUSE)

BABYLON: I don't know, if it's gluten free...

SAGAL: They're reacting to all this negative publicity because of the name pink slime. They fought back with a campaign highlighting all the jobs at the factory where this stuff is processed. That's right, it's not an awful abomination in the eyes of all that's holy, it's a job creator.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

BABYLON: Can you see Obama on the campaign trail at the pink slime factory? Guy over here making pink slime and...

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

(SOUNDBITE OF APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: It's American pink slime.

BABYLON: It's a mixed in slime.

POUNDSTONE: Wow that is good.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Brian, workers at a company in Lithuania voted to strike this week, but the government intervened. They said the workers are essential to the well being and safety of the people of Lithuania. What do these workers make?

BABYLON: Is it something that couples need?

SAGAL: No.

BABYLON: Okay.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

BABYLON: All right, I want to win. Give me a light baby clue.

SAGAL: A baby clue? This strike neither tastes great nor is it less filling.

BABYLON: Oh, beer.

SAGAL: Yes.

BABYLON: Yes.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

SAGAL: Beer, they make beer.

(SOUNDBITE OF APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: Workers at the Carlsberg factory in Lithuania had tried to walk out over a pay dispute but the courts stopped them. They put beer in the same legal category as medicine and drinking water.

POUNDSTONE: Wow.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: They're essential to the wellbeing of Lithuania and the production must be maintained. And beer is particularly essential when the medicine and drinking water run out.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

BABYLON: Hold on, what's that face?

POUNDSTONE: I wanted you to do Obama.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

POUNDSTONE: Telling the beer workers to get back to work.

BABYLON: You ready?

SAGAL: Yeah.

BABYLON: You going to get back and you're going to make that Carlsberg beer.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

(SOUNDBITE OF APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: That's great.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

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