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Prediction

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Prediction

Prediction

Prediction

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Now that they've sanctioned strip searches for speeding tickets, our panelists predict what will be the next surprising Supreme Court ruling.

PETER SAGAL, HOST:

Now, panel, what will the next shocking Supreme Court ruling be? Adam Felber?

ADAM FELBER: They're going to keep that spring break momentum going, baby. Next up, mandatory universal t-shirt dousing and jello shots for all.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Roxanne Roberts?

ROXANNE ROBERTS: The court will uphold random "just for fun" strip searches at the Supreme Court.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: And Roy Blount, Jr.?

ROY BLOUNT JR.: In order to make the whole thing more even handed and fair, after the police strip search you, you will have to strip search the police.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

CARL KASELL: Well, if the Supreme Court announces any of those actions and decisions, panel, we'll ask you about it on WAIT WAIT...DON'T TELL ME!

SAGAL: Thank you, Carl Kasell. Thanks also to Adam Felber, Roxanne Roberts, Roy Blount, Jr.

(SOUNDBITE OF APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: Thanks to all of you for listening. I'm Peter Sagal. We are done here. We will see you next week, Boston, Massachusetts.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

SAGAL: This is NPR.

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