Fresh Air Weekend: R.A. Dickey, Carole King

Carole King was in a doo-wop group called the Co-Sines when she was a teenager. i i

Carole King was in a doo-wop group called the Co-Sines when she was a teenager. Jim McCrary hide caption

itoggle caption Jim McCrary
Carole King was in a doo-wop group called the Co-Sines when she was a teenager.

Carole King was in a doo-wop group called the Co-Sines when she was a teenager.

Jim McCrary

Fresh Air Weekend highlights some of the best interviews and reviews from past weeks, and new program elements specially paced for weekends. Our weekend show emphasizes interviews with writers, filmmakers, actors, and musicians, and often includes excerpts from live in-studio concerts. This week:


Carole King wrote songs for others before becoming a performer and writing for herself. In her new memoir, A Natural Woman, she details the stories behind some of her most famous songs and her relationships with songwriters like James Taylor, Gerry Goffin and Paul Simon.

Bonnie Raitt's 'Slipstream': A Barnstorming Good Time: Slipstream is Raitt's first album since 2005's Souls Alike, and she's produced most of the tracks herself. Rock critic Ken Tucker says that this return to recording and her renewed control over her music has resulted in one of Raitt's finest albums.

'Winding Up' As The Mets' Knuckleball Pitcher: New York Mets pitcher R.A. Dickey is currently the only knuckleball pitcher in the major leagues. His new memoir, Wherever I Wind Up, explains how his life — and career — have mimicked the unpredictable trajectory of the difficult pitch he throws game after game.

You can listen to the original broadcasts here:

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