Dead Rapper Makes Virtual Stage Appearance

Over the weekend, Tupac Shakur made his first appearance on stage since he was shot dead 15 years ago. Shakur was resurrected for a performance with rappers Snoop Dogg and Dr. Dre in the form a realistic looking two dimensional computer image.

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LYNN NEARY, HOST:

They say the only things that are certain in life are death and taxes. But half that statement appears to be under challenge by one late rap star and some special effects, which brings us to today's last word in business - virtual comeback.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "CALIFORNIA LOVE")

TUPAC SHAKUR: (Singing) California love.

NEARY: Over the weekend, the rapper Tupac Shakur made his first appearance on stage since he was shot dead 15 years ago. The performer was resurrected for a performance with rappers Snoop Dogg and Dr. Dre in the form a realistic-looking two dimensional computer image. It was created by the Oscar-winning visual effects firm Digital Domain.

The response was so enthusiastic that plans are now in the works for a virtual Tupac tour, featuring Dr. Dre and Snoop Dogg, according to a source cited in the Wall Street Journal. Neither of the living performers commented, but as Digital Domain's chief officer told the journal, this is just the beginning.

And that's the business news on MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Lynn Neary.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep. And just this program reminder: At the top of the hour, we'll have analysis of today's news from Edward R. Murrow.

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