Weekly Standard: War On Taxes

Partner content from The Weekly Standard

Protesters dressed in baseball uniforms and cheerleading outfits calling themselves "The Tax Dodgers" and "Corporate Loopholes" perform a skit during a tax day demonstration on April 17, 2012 in New York City. Dozens of protesters participated in a demonstration against loopholes that allow banks and corporations to pay lower income taxes than most individual tax filers. i i

Protesters dressed in baseball uniforms and cheerleading outfits calling themselves "The Tax Dodgers" and "Corporate Loopholes" perform a skit during a tax day demonstration on April 17, 2012 in New York City. Dozens of protesters participated in a demonstration against loopholes that allow banks and corporations to pay lower income taxes than most individual tax filers. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Justin Sullivan/Getty Images
Protesters dressed in baseball uniforms and cheerleading outfits calling themselves "The Tax Dodgers" and "Corporate Loopholes" perform a skit during a tax day demonstration on April 17, 2012 in New York City. Dozens of protesters participated in a demonstration against loopholes that allow banks and corporations to pay lower income taxes than most individual tax filers.

Protesters dressed in baseball uniforms and cheerleading outfits calling themselves "The Tax Dodgers" and "Corporate Loopholes" perform a skit during a tax day demonstration on April 17, 2012 in New York City. Dozens of protesters participated in a demonstration against loopholes that allow banks and corporations to pay lower income taxes than most individual tax filers.

Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Daniel Harper is The Weekly Standard's online editor.

President Obama and the Democratic party sure are fighting wars on many fronts. NBC reports that "the Obama campaign is calling on Mitt Romney to release his — as well as those going back several years."

"Mitt Romney's defiance of decades of precedent set by presidential candidates on both sides of the aisle, including his own father, begs the question — what does he have to hide?" Obama Campaign Manager Jim Messina asked in a statement. "Did he exploit loopholes in the tax code by keeping his investments offshore and is that why he's protecting those loopholes now? Why did he open a Swiss bank account instead of an American bank account and establish a corporation in Bermuda instead of on our shores? Did he pay a lower income tax rate than the 13.9 percent he paid in 2010 and is that why he opposes the Buffett Rule to ensure millionaires don't pay less taxes than middle-class families?"

This isn't an issue that's going to go away anytime soon, it seems. And obviously Obama and the Democrats think the tax issue is a good one for them.

But consider what happened with the war on women. It has seemed to backfire — with Democrats now backing away. "I'm not a fan of the term," a DNC spokesman said in an interview. "I mean, I'm sure I've probably used it. We all fall into these easy vernaculars... but we in the DNC have not been running a campaign based on the term 'war on Women.' That's a myth cooked up by Republicans."

So, will the upcoming war on taxes meet the same fate of the last one started by Obama and the Democratic party? Or we are several news cycles away from the next ceasefire?

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