TV Goes To The Dogs At Home Alone

An entity called "DOGTV" launched online in California two months ago and has plans for national distribution. The advertising-free programming is aimed at stay-at-home dogs whose out-to-work masters fret about the separation anxiety their pets suffer, and the trouble they get into, when left unattended for long stretches of time.

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AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

A new TV channel is going to the dogs.

BECKY LUBEACH: It is TV that is shot from a dog's perspective.

CORNISH: That's Becky Lubeach of DOGTV.

LUBEACH: It's been enhanced, that - the colors that they see pop out. And the music has all been composed for them.

CORNISH: In other words, entertainment made not for you, but for your stay-at-home hound. No sitcoms about dogs; no "Jersey Shore"; no ads, either.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Lubeach says DOGTV's programming is scientifically developed for dogs left alone, and it's programmed by time of day.

(SOUNDBITE OF BIRDS CHIRPING)

CORNISH: In the morning, content to get the dog up and playing.

LUBEACH: And that stimulation could be two dogs playing tug-of-war. It could be playing with some kids outside - those types of things.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

BLOCK: Midday programming is meant to calm your pet down. There's also a learning side called "Exposure."

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN: Stay. Good boy, Callie.

LUBEACH: Like the mailman coming to the front door. Or my dog was actually featured in a segment where he went to the vet - shot down low for that. A dog can experience things that they might not encounter in everyday life.

(SOUNDBITE OF SIREN)

CORNISH: Dog lovers, don't check your local cable listings just yet. DOGTV is available online for free, to any Internet-savvy pooch. But the cable TV version is only available right now in San Diego.

BLOCK: But never fear: Its creators hope to land a distribution deal soon and unleash DOGTV nationwide.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

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