Video Asks Asma Assad To Help Stop Syrian Conflict

Earlier this week, two women took a new approach to raising awareness about Syria's crackdown. The wives of the British and German ambassadors to the United Nations appealed directly to Syria's first lady with a video on YouTube. The narrator calls on Asma Assad to "stop being a bystander" — and to stop her husband and his supporters from continuing the conflict.

Copyright © 2012 NPR. For personal, noncommercial use only. See Terms of Use. For other uses, prior permission required.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Earlier this week, two women took a new approach to raising awareness about Syria's crackdown. The wives of the British and German ambassadors to the United Nations appealed to Syria's first lady with a video on YouTube.

(SOUNDBITE OF VIDEO)

SHEILA LYALL GRANT: This is a letter to Asma al-Assad, signed by women all over the world.

INSKEEP: Their video shows a clip of Asma al-Assad, the Syrian first lady, from before the uprising, speaking to a room full of children.

ASMA AL-ASSAD: We all deserve the same thing. We should all be able to live in peace, stability, and with our dignities.

INSKEEP: And then the video contrasts her own words with graphic images of children killed or injured over the past year. The Syrian first lady has kept silent about the violence sweeping her country. The narrator calls on Asma al-Assad to stop being a bystander, and to stop her husband and his supporters from continuing the conflict.

Copyright © 2012 NPR. All rights reserved. No quotes from the materials contained herein may be used in any media without attribution to NPR. This transcript is provided for personal, noncommercial use only, pursuant to our Terms of Use. Any other use requires NPR's prior permission. Visit our permissions page for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by a contractor for NPR, and accuracy and availability may vary. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Please be aware that the authoritative record of NPR's programming is the audio.

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and terms of use, and will be moderated prior to posting. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.