Song Of The Day

Glacier Face: A Warm Ode To Cold Climes

Conceived in Santa Fe and Scandinavia, Glacier Face's "Fahrenheit" is a gorgeous wanderer's ode to the world's connectedness. i i

Conceived in Santa Fe and Scandinavia, Glacier Face's "Fahrenheit" is a gorgeous wanderer's ode to the world's connectedness. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of the artist
Conceived in Santa Fe and Scandinavia, Glacier Face's "Fahrenheit" is a gorgeous wanderer's ode to the world's connectedness.

Conceived in Santa Fe and Scandinavia, Glacier Face's "Fahrenheit" is a gorgeous wanderer's ode to the world's connectedness.

Courtesy of the artist

Wednesday's Pick

Song: "Fahrenheit"

Artist: Glacier Face

CD: I Believe You

Genre: Electronic Pop

Wesley Berg created Glacier Face during his residency at Iceland's Baer Art Center, an art colony deep in the middle of beautiful nowhere, where horses graze in bright green fields, snow-capped mountains reflect off glassy waters and the summer sun never sets. Berg recorded I Believe You's demos while falling in love with those surroundings, and it shows: The melody and vocals in "Fahrenheit" are as pleasant as northern Iceland's landscape.

Pretty ticks and blips are peppered over soft, full synth chords and light snare taps, while Berg's calm, reassuring voice encourages listeners: "You're headed for the tallest tree / I know it wasn't easy / but believe me now anyhow / you'll make it through the winter." Halfway through, Berg sings, "The weather changes from Fahrenheit to Celsius," referencing a split between two different areas of the world. Most of the song isn't about Scandinavia, but another part of the world close to Berg's heart: the American Southwest. Both in Scandinavia and during a hike in Santa Fe National Forest, his feet were similarly "buried in the snow," leading Berg to question his surroundings entirely. The seed for "Fahrenheit" was planted in one place while it bloomed in another, adding up to a gorgeous wanderer's ode to the world's connectedness.

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Song Of The Day