"Most animals learn by trial and error. There's just one problem: error." - Dan Gilbert i

"Most animals learn by trial and error. There's just one problem: error." - Dan Gilbert Shutterstock hide caption

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"Most animals learn by trial and error. There's just one problem: error." - Dan Gilbert

"Most animals learn by trial and error. There's just one problem: error." - Dan Gilbert

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Our Buggy Brain

Our amazing brain performs harmonious functions and peculiar actions that might seem counterintuitive. What tricks make us think it's okay to cheat or steal? Are we in control of our own decisions? Why do our brains misjudge what will make us happy?

"Most animals learn by trial and error. There's just one problem: error." — Dan Gilbert

Our amazing brain, with all of its harmonious functions, also performs any number of peculiar actions, which we might find unexpected and counterintuitive. What tricks do our minds play when we think it's okay to lie, cheat, or steal? How in control are we of our own decisions? And why do our brains systematically misjudge what will make us happy?

"Most animals learn by trial and error. There's just one problem: error." — Dan Gilbert Asa Mathat/TED hide caption

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What Makes Us Happy?

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