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Help For The Economy? Not From Debt-Bound Grads

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Help For The Economy? Not From Debt-Bound Grads

Help For The Economy? Not From Debt-Bound Grads

Help For The Economy? Not From Debt-Bound Grads

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/151650640/151653642" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Gan Golan of Los Angeles, dressed as the "Master of Degrees," holds a ball and chain representing his college loan debt during Occupy D.C. activities in Washington. Average in-state tuition and fees at four-year public colleges rose an additional $631 this fall, or 8.3 percent, compared with a year ago. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Jacquelyn Martin/AP

Gan Golan of Los Angeles, dressed as the "Master of Degrees," holds a ball and chain representing his college loan debt during Occupy D.C. activities in Washington. Average in-state tuition and fees at four-year public colleges rose an additional $631 this fall, or 8.3 percent, compared with a year ago.

Jacquelyn Martin/AP

In this week's podcast of weekends on All Things Considered, the student debt crisis, and the life and death of facts. Plus, the D-Day rehearsal that ended in disaster, remembering the LA riots, and pastor Joel Osteen. Also, "Glee" star Chris Colfer's new movie and country singer Carrie Underwood.