'Blown Covers': Not Ready For The Newsstand

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    Art Spiegelman repainted Norman Rockwell's Freedom from Want in the fall of 2001, a time of sporadic attacks on American Muslim families. The sketch was accepted, but reports that the United States was, to the confusion of local children, dropping both cluster bombs and care packages in Afghanistan led Spiegelman to choose to commemorate that event instead.
    Cover on left copyright 2001 Art Spiegelman & The New Yorker/Conde Nast Archive
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    When Haitian immigrant Abner Louima was brutally attacked and sodomized in 1997 by white police officers, many New Yorkers were angered by the a mayor's reluctance to investigate the police. Mayor Rudolph Giuliani, portrayed in a sketch by Harry Bliss, barely hid his prejudices.
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    Barry Blitt first tried his idea with two children and then with two businessmen before finding the right combination — two Arab men. All versions of the image make fun of terrorism, but only one makes fun of our own fears. In all instances, the co-conspirators look conspicuosly guilty and make sure that the flight attendant has safely passed. In the end, the images did not run out of a concern that the Diet Coke and Mentos reference may just have been too obscure for many of the New Yorker's readers.
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    The molestation and child-abuse scandals hovering over the Catholic Church and the theme of Father's Day, a perennial one for New Yorker covers, provided Blitt with the inspiration to depict a delighted-looking priest surrounded by unsmiling cherubs.
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    "Tiger Woods' whole thing was that he was so wholesome, a clean young man who sponsored many products. You just didn't think of him doing something like this. And the whole scandal just kept getting tawdrier and tawdrier, as more and more women stepped forward," Blitt remembers. "My image is, on the surface so clean because you really have to have some remove from the tabloidness of a story like this, otherwise it woudn't seem New Yorker-y . To see him in bed with a whole bunch of women, that wouldn't work."
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    After the 2008 election, artists needed to find acceptable ways to represent this new president, who functioned as the repository of so many people's hopes and expectations. Anita Kunz sketched Obama inheriting eight years of Republican mess.
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    In a sketch that Spiegelman proposed during George W. Bush's first term, Martin Luther King Jr.'s dream becomes a nightmare as black leaders like Colin Powell and Condoleezza Rice provide cover for Bush.

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Blown Covers

New Yorker Covers You Were Never Meant to See

by Francoise Mouly

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New Yorker Covers You Were Never Meant to See
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This week's cover of the New Yorker magazine is a witty drawing by artist Chris Ware of a playground full of young children and their watchful parents. One woman wheels her son in a stroller, only to see that all the other parents are men. The image is called "Mother's Day."

But for all the memorable New Yorker covers out there, an equally large number of covers didn't make it to the newsstand. They were not quite on the money — or were sometimes a little too coarsely on the money.

Francoise Mouly, the magazine's art editor, is also the author of a new book, Blown Covers: New Yorker Covers You Were Never Meant to See. Mouly generally has a stack of rejected covers in her office, and she tells NPR's Robert Siegel that finding just the right image is the cornerstone of her work. "The one that will provoke discourse," she says.

One of the rejected covers comes from the era of the Diet Coke and Mentos Internet phenomenon, when viral videos showed the explosive results of combining the two products.

"The first [idea] by Barry Blitt, the artist who came up with this, was to show two little kids in an airplane, exchanging Diet Coke and Mentos," she says, "so they're about to make an explosion and the stewardess is walking past." Blitt reworked the image with two businessmen before he hit on the idea of having two Middle Eastern-appearing men passing the dangerous snacks back and forth.

"You're not mocking Arab people or casting them in a role; you're making fun of our own fears," Mouly says. But the image didn't make the final cut, in part because editors feared the Diet Coke and Mentos reference might be too obscure for New Yorker readers.

Francoise Mouly has been The New Yorker's art editor since 1993. From 1980 to 1991 she co-edited the influential comics anthology RAW with husband Art Spiegelman. i i

Francoise Mouly has been The New Yorker's art editor since 1993. From 1980 to 1991 she co-edited the influential comics anthology RAW with husband Art Spiegelman. Sarah Shatz/Abrams Books hide caption

itoggle caption Sarah Shatz/Abrams Books
Francoise Mouly has been The New Yorker's art editor since 1993. From 1980 to 1991 she co-edited the influential comics anthology RAW with husband Art Spiegelman.

Francoise Mouly has been The New Yorker's art editor since 1993. From 1980 to 1991 she co-edited the influential comics anthology RAW with husband Art Spiegelman.

Sarah Shatz/Abrams Books

Another rejected cover poked fun at the Catholic Church's embarrassment over the child-abuse scandal. It showed the pope replicating a classic Marilyn Monroe pose over a subway grate, with his vestments flying up around him. While it became the cover image for the new book, it did not make the magazine.

"That image made immediate sense to me; I thought it denounced the hypocrisy of the church," she says. And she applauds the artists who don't censor themselves, who feel comfortable sending in whatever ideas cross their minds. But, she adds, this particular image didn't hold up to scrutiny by New Yorker editors. "What does the pope have to do with Marilyn Monroe? It falls apart."

The Marilyn pose is iconic, almost cliched at this point — in fact, it appears in several other rejected covers. But Mouly says cartoonists have to work with cliches. "A businessman carries a suitcase," she says. "And what you are hoping is that they will use those cliches to make new points, and to make you see something that you thought you understood in a new way. The challenge that they give themselves is a picture of our times."

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