Summer Employment Looks Sunnier For Teens

In a new report, the employment firm Challenger, Gray and Christmas predicts more jobs for teenagers this summer. While the jobs picture is improving, CEO John Challenger says teen hiring is still several years away from returning to pre-recession levels.

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DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Now for those just entering the labor force, there may be some cause for optimism. Our last word in business is: get a job.

In a new report, the employment firm, Challenger, Gray & Christmas, predicts more jobs for teenagers this summer. While the jobs picture is improving, CEO John Challenger says teen hiring is still several years away from returning to pre-recession levels, so those who want to work this summer should start looking right now. The CEO also advises young people who are looking for work to get off your computers and start pounding the pavement. He sees opportunity in two types of work that predate computers: baby-sitting and cutting the grass.

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GREENE: That is the business news here on MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. And I'm David Greene.

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