Presidential Election Protest In Egypt Turns Deadly

Islamist protesters, unhappy their candidate was among several people disqualified from the election, held a demonstration outside the Defense Ministry. Five people were killed and more than 100 people were wounded in fighting that involved sticks, stones, batons and bullets.

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Vast as they are, the interrelated problems of Afghanistan, Pakistan and al-Qaida are only some of the problems the president faces - and that will be faced by whoever wins this fall's election. Egypt is preparing for a presidential election of its own, the first since a revolution toppled President Hosni Mubarak. And today, a protest related to that election led to deadly violence.

Islamist protesters were unhappy that their candidate was among several people disqualified from the presidential election. They held a demonstration outside the Defense Ministry - home of the army that still holds great power in Egypt.

And according to a state news agency, the protesters were attacked, by men identified only as "armed thugs." Five people were killed, and more than 100 were wounded, we're told, in fighting that involved sticks, stones, batons and bullets.

Egyptians are scheduled to vote for president on May 23 and 24.

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