'No Capers In The Kitchen:' Oyster Joint Turns 100

One hundred years ago this past week, Frank and Rose Snock opened their fish restaurant in Philadelphia. A century later, Snockey's Oyster and Crab House is still serving up deep-fried fish fillets, deviled clams and, of course, oysters.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

One hundred years ago this past week, Frank and Rose Snock opened their fish restaurant in Philadelphia. A century later, Snockey's Oyster and Crab House is still serving up deep-fried fish fillets, deviled clams and, of course, oysters.

They've got as many as a dozen varieties. Today, it's the Snock's grandchildren, Ken and Skip, who are running the show. But apparently, not much else has changed. Snockey's is still making the same oyster stew that Rose cooked for 79 years.

And while fancy fish recipes have acquired a certain cachet among foodies, Snockey's is sticking with its no-nonsense approach. Ken Snock told the Philadelphia Inquirer: We don't have capers in our kitchen, there's no fennel-leek reduction back there.

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