Vidal Sassoon Revolutionized Women's Hair Styles

Hairstyling icon Vidal Sassoon has died at the age of 84. He first earned acclaim for creating hair cuts that needed little styling.

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DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And our last word in business is: Thank you, Vidal.

One of the world's most famous hair stylists, Vidal Sassoon, died yesterday. His iconic cuts, like the bob, required such little effort, no curling or teasing. He described his approach in an interview last year on WHYY's FRESH AIR with Terry Gross.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED AUDIO)

VIDAL SASSOON: Look, some of them looked very, very pretty but I wasn't after pretty. I was after bones, getting into that bone structure, making it work.

GREENE: What resulted was a revolution in how women thought about their style. Vidal Sassoon opened salons across the globe and launched a hair care line.

(SOUNDBITE OF SASSOON AD)

SASSOON: New advanced salon formula.

UNIDENTIFIED WOMEN: Thank you, Vidal.

SASSOON: If you don't look good we don't look good.

GREENE: Thank you, Vidal just Wash-and-Go.

And that's the business news on MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm David Greene.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep.

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