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Prediction

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Prediction

Prediction

Prediction

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Our panelists predict where we'll find that $3 billion lost by JP Morgan Chase.

PETER SAGAL, HOST:

Now, panel, what, will it turn out, happened to the 3 Billion Dollars? Brian Babylon?

BRIAN BABYLON: The Marines used the money to create a secret army of Carl Kassel clone super soldiers.

SAGAL: There you go.

(SOUNDBITE OF APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: I'll buy that. Roxanne Roberts?

ROXANNE ROBERTS: The London Whale may have disappeared, but a certain Mr. John Smith just bought three billion shares of Facebook.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: And Charlie Pierce?

CHARLIE PIERCE: Well, Peter, in JPMorgan Chase world headquarters, there's this really, really big couch. And if you look between the cushions, there you are.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

(SOUNDBITE OF APPLAUSE)

CARL KASELL: If any of that is what happened to the money, panel, we'll ask you about it on WAIT WAIT...DON'T TELL ME!.

SAGAL: Thank you, Carl Kasell. Thanks also to Charlie Pierce, Roxanne Roberts, and Brian Babylon.

(SOUNDBITE OF APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: Thanks to all of you for listening. I'm Peter Sagal. We'll see you right back here next week.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

SAGAL: This is NPR.

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