Norah Jones In Concert

Concerts

Norah Jones In ConcertXPN

Norah Jones In Concert

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By the numbers, Norah Jones' career is almost unheard-of: How many artists sell 20 million copies of their first album? Jones' sultry, soulful Come Away With Me launched a career in which she won Grammy after Grammy, collaborated with the likes of Ray Charles, Willie Nelson, Dolly Parton, OutKast, Foo Fighters... the list goes on. Through it all, she's remained adventurous, incorporating country, roots-rock and trip-hop elements into her jazzy releases.

Jones has music in her blood: The daughter of sitar legend Ravi Shankar and concert producer Sue Jones, she was born in New York and raised in Texas. Soon, she developed a love for Billie Holiday, played the alto sax and piano, and made her way to New York with songs in hand. Jones is now on her fifth studio album, Little Broken Hearts. Produced by Danger Mouse (a.k.a. Brian Burton), the collection forgoes the soft coffeehouse jazz of Jones' past in favor of rough-around-the-edges pop.

Here, she performs a short concert at World Cafe Live in Philadelphia, as part of WXPN's Non-Commvention.

Set List

  • "Happy Pills"
  • "Little Broken Hearts"
  • "Travelin' On"
  • "Take It Back"
  • "Say Goodbye"
  • "Come Away With Me"
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