"B" Somebody

Puzzle guru Art Chung leads this brain-buster, and asks contestants to add the letter "B" to someone's name to make a new word. For example, the letter "B," plus a certain talking horse, equals where you might end up at night: a bed.

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OPHIRA EISENBERG, HOST:

All right, we have new contestants. Jessica Leeser and Corinne Miller. Welcome.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Now Jessica, you come from a big puzzle family?

JESSICA LEESER: Yes. Well, yeah. Math, puzzles.

EISENBERG: You played math at home growing up for fun?

LEESER: My dad once bought my sister a book about numbers and math puzzles and she did not have a very happy look on her face when she opened up the gift. But my dad said, in the most sincerest voice I've ever heard him use, he said, I just want you to love numbers as much as I love numbers.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Excellent. It's a pleasure to have you on the show.

LEESER: Thank you.

EISENBERG: Hi Corinne.

CORINNE MILLER: Hi.

EISENBERG: I know that you travel a little bit. I did a little research on you and I appreciate the fact that you kind of take matters into your own hands.

MILLER: Yes. I do. When I went to Barcelona for the first time I was mugged. Somebody stole my bag and my passport, but instead of crying and sitting on the street and not knowing what to do, I chased after him, found him getting onto his bicycle, jumped onto his bicycle and got my bag back.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: All right. I'm not going to mess with you. OK. This is a game called Be Somebody.

JOHN CHANESKI: This is a word game in which we're going to add the letter B in front of common men's and women's names to form another word. Ophira, for example, if we said B plus a talking horse equals where you might wind up at night, you would say... bed. Talking horse is Ed plus the letter B in front is bed. So you got that?

EISENBERG: Ah, right.

CHANESKI: Whoever gets more right will move on to our Ask Me One More final round. You guys ready? Great.

The letter B plus an honest president equals a...

MILLER: Babe!

CHANESKI: ... famous pig. Corinne, you can go.

MILLER: Babe.

CHANESKI: Babe, that's correct. B plus Abe equals Babe.

(APPLAUSE)

CHANESKI: The letter B plus Truman's successor's nickname equals something Lance Armstrong owns. Jessica.

LEESER: Bike.

CHANESKI: Bike is correct, yes.

(APPLAUSE)

CHANESKI: The letter B plus a role played by Jamie Fox equals cry like a donkey.

Jessica.

LEESER: Bray.

CHANESKI: Bray, correct.

EISENBERG: Bray!

(APPLAUSE)

CHANESKI: Be plus Lindsay Lohan's younger sister equals an island in South-East Asia. Jessica.

LEESER: Bali.

CHANESKI: Bali is correct.

(APPLAUSE)

LEESER: So mortified I know that!

JONATHAN COULTON: That you knew do that?

LEESER: That I know that.

CHANESKI: You're the first person in all our run throughs who knew who Lindsay Lohan's sister was. So congratulations.

LEESER: Oh, good Lord, OK.

CHANESKI: OK.

LEESER: Thank you. For that compliment.

CHANESKI: The letter B plus an Oregon college attended by Steve Jobs equals, to produce offspring.

Jessica?

LEESER: Reproduce? No, that sentence doesn't start with a B.

CHANESKI: That does not... Reproduce College, that was a 2-year college, right?

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: Depends what your Plan B was.

COULTON: It was literally about nine months. About nine months college.

CHANESKI: Corinne, any idea?

MILLER: Breed.

CHANESKI: Breed, is correct. But no points.

OK. The letter B plus Tom Hanks' wife equals a brand of water filter. Jessica.

EISENBERG: OK Jessica.

LEESER: Brita.

CHANESKI: Brita's correct. Tom Hanks, Rita Wilson.

(APPLAUSE)

CHANESKI: Well then, I think Jessica, you won.

EISENBERG: Well done Jessica.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Thank you Corinne. Jessica, you'll be moving on to our final elimination round.

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