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Foreign Policy: Egypt's Revolutionary Soul-Searching

Egyptian protesters with their mouths covered hold signs against the former regime and in support of the revolution during a demonstration in Cairo's central Tahrir Square on June 1, before Mubarak's sentence was announced. Marco Longari/AFP/GettyImages hide caption

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Marco Longari/AFP/GettyImages

Egyptian protesters with their mouths covered hold signs against the former regime and in support of the revolution during a demonstration in Cairo's central Tahrir Square on June 1, before Mubarak's sentence was announced.

Marco Longari/AFP/GettyImages

Tahrir Square is back. On June 2, an Egyptian court sentenced former President Hosni Mubarak and former Interior Minister Habib el-Adly to life in prison for failing to stop the killing of protesters during last year's revolution — but dismissed charges against Mubarak's sons and top security officials of the old regime. Many Egyptians derided the verdict as insufficient and politically motivated, and flocked to the square to express their displeasure with the ruling military government.

With Egypt set for a presidential run-off election that pits a top-ranking member of the Mubarak regime against a representative of the Muslim Brotherhood, the renewal of protests in Tahrir is another sign that the country's shaky transition is far from complete. Whatever happens, politics in Cairo appears poised to play out not only at the ballot box, but on the streets as well.

See The Rest Of This Slideshow At Foreign Policy.