Michelle Obama's Workout Jams: 'I Really Mix It Up'

More than 10,000 children from Iowa schools joined Michelle Obama during the "Let's Move" interactive celebration in Des Moines last February. i i

hide captionMore than 10,000 children from Iowa schools joined Michelle Obama during the "Let's Move" interactive celebration in Des Moines last February.

Conrad Schmidt/AFP/Getty Images
More than 10,000 children from Iowa schools joined Michelle Obama during the "Let's Move" interactive celebration in Des Moines last February.

More than 10,000 children from Iowa schools joined Michelle Obama during the "Let's Move" interactive celebration in Des Moines last February.

Conrad Schmidt/AFP/Getty Images

The year began with New Year's resolutions to get fit and ever since, Morning Edition has been talking to athletes, musicians, a mail carrier and the head of the IRS about the music that gets them moving. The Ultimate NPR Workout Mix series concludes with a contribution from Michelle Obama.

The first lady is the mover and shaker behind "Let's Move," a campaign designed to get young people, in particular, to eat better and exercise more.

During a recent tour of the White House vegetable garden, Obama shared the key to her workout routine.

"I really mix it up," she says. "Some weights, some kickboxing, lots of cardio. You know — I try to make it fun, to do a little yoga when I can."

Obama says she likes a good mix of workout music, as well.

"A good workout jam is Beyonce's 'Move Your Body,'" she says. "That's got a good beat and, you know, it's talking about [moving] your body, right? So she's always a good one for me."

The first lady also recommends Stevie Wonder's "Signed, Sealed, Delivered (I'm Yours)."

"Now, that's an oldie," she says. "One of my mom's favorites, got a great beat."

For the kids, Obama suggests Willow Smith's "Whip My Hair" — a fast-paced tune with an electronic flair.

Clearly, variety is key. But when you're the first lady, squeezing in a workout can be tricky. Background briefings on world leaders, getting your gowns fitted and hair done, representing your nation at state dinners — that can put a dent in an exercise routine.

"You know, sometimes I'm not successful, which is why I try to work out as much as possible when I do have the time, so that that week or those few days when I miss something, it's not the end of the world," Obama says. "And I would encourage people: Don't beat yourself up, because sometimes life happens and you just can't get it done. But when I'm on the road, I bring a jump rope."

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