Taco Bell's Doritos Locos Taco Is Big Hit

The taco is made with a shell of nacho cheese Doritos. Taco Bell's chief executive hailed it as a "flavor pairing waiting to happen." After a big media blitz, taco lovers have spoken — by buying 100 million Doritos Locos Tacos in about 10 weeks.

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DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And today's last word in business is: Crispy and cheesy and really, really profitable.

You might remember when we introduced you to Taco Bell's Doritos Locos Taco a few months ago. It's a taco made with a shell of Nacho Cheese Doritos. Taco Bell's chief executive hailed it as a flavor pairing waiting to happen. And after a huge media rollout, taco lovers have spoken by buying 100 million Doritos Locos Tacos in about 10 weeks. That is a whole lot of tacos.

To compare, it took McDonald's a decade to sell 100 million hamburgers. The innovation helped raise Taco Bell sales figures and inspired a chain to consider some new offerings. This time a bit more refined. Next month the chain will roll out menu items from celebrity chef Lorena Garcia, including gourmet burritos. Gourmet. That's going to mean no Doritos, isn't it?

That's the business news on MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm David Greene.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

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