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Prediction

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Prediction

Prediction

Prediction

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Our panelists predict, now that Disney has taken on the obesity epidemic, what will be the next world problem Disney tries to solve?

PETER SAGAL, HOST:

Now, panel, what problem will Disney solve next? Mr. P.J. O'Rourke?

P.J. O'ROURKE: Peace, love and understanding, which is why they're getting rid of Donald Duck.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Roxanne Roberts?

ROXANNE ROBERTS: It will save the Miss Universe pageant by allowing women, women who used to be men, fairy princesses and transgendered mice with big ears.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: And Mo Rocca?

MO ROCCA: To help find a cure for a host of chronic diseases, Disney will donate Mickey and Minnie to a lab for testing.

(LAUGHTER)

(APPLAUSE)

CARL KASELL: Well, if Disney does any of those things, panel, we'll ask you about it on WAIT WAIT...DON'T TELL ME!

SAGAL: Thank you, Carl Kasell. Thanks also to P.J. O'Rourke, Roxanne Roberts and Mo Rocca.

(APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: Thanks this week to Blythe Haga, Lettie Holman and everyone at WAMU Washington. Thanks to our fabulous audience here at the Music Center at Strathmore in North Bethesda, Maryland. Thanks to all of you for listening. I'm Peter Sagal, and we'll see you next week.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

SAGAL: This is NPR.

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