Domain-Name Expansion Prompts Rush Of Applications

The group that governs Internet names is allowing for more "top-level domain names" — that's the technical term for endings like dot-com and dot-net. Nearly 2,000 applications poured in from companies hoping to grab domain name endings like dot-app, dot-eat and dot-baby. Google spent more than $18 million to apply for the rights to obvious endings like dot-google and dot-goog. It's also among seven companies that applied to own dot-love.

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RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Our last word in business today is dot free for all.

The group that governs Internet names is allowing for more top-level domain names - that's the technical term for endings like dot-com and dot-net. Nearly 2,000 applications poured in from companies hoping to grab domain name endings like dot-app, dot-eat and dot-baby.

Google went all out, spending more than $18 million to apply for the rights to obvious endings like dot-google and dot-goog. But Google also applied to own dot-love. Hmm.

Well, in any case, there could be romantic friction between six other companies who want dot-love as well. Someone may have to settle for dot-L-U-V.

That's the business news on MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene.

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