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Sports Artists LeRoy Neiman Dies At 91

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Sports Artists LeRoy Neiman Dies At 91

Remembrances

Sports Artists LeRoy Neiman Dies At 91

Sports Artists LeRoy Neiman Dies At 91

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LeRoy Neiman, who painted and sketched the Super Bowl and the Olympics, died Wednesday at the age of 91. You know the paintings when you see them — impressionistic images with bright splashes of color.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

LeRoy Neiman's American Dream included a paintbrush. He was a self-described street kid who grew up to become one of the nation's best-known artists, mingling with the likes of Muhammad Ali and Frank Sinatra.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Neiman died yesterday at age 91. He was known for his long-handled bar mustache and for his distinctive paintings of sports figures. You know the paintings when you see them: impressionistic images with bright splashes of color.

INSKEEP: His style captured the motion of athletes leaping toward a basketball goal or Jack Nicklaus following through on a golf swing. He sketched Olympic events live on television, and also captured less-kinetic scenes. He once captured Bobby Fischer and Boris Spassky playing their 1972 world chess championship in Reykjavik.

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