I-Tunes

Listen carefully, because all the answers to this quiz are songs whose titles end in a long "I" sound. Jonathan Coulton shows off his range of impressions, from Bob Marley to 'NSYNC.

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OPHIRA EISENBERG, HOST:

This is ASK ME ANOTHER. I'm your host Ophira Eisenberg, the biggest know-it-all you'll ever meet because I already have the answers. Ha, ha. First off joining me is Jonathan Coulton.

(APPLAUSE)

JONATHAN COULTON: Yo!

EISENBERG: Thank you for providing our music tonight. And our puzzle gurus, Art Chung and John Chaneski.

(APPLAUSE)

ART CHUNG: Hi, Ophira.

EISENBERG: So we're going to start things off. Jonathan, it's you and me for this first game. Here is our very first contestant. April Salazar, welcome to ASK ME ANOTHER.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Now I have been talking to our producers and they tell me that this is a bit of a legacy for your tradition as your mother was actually on a game show...

APRIL SALAZAR: Yes.

EISENBERG: ...in the nineties "To Tell The Truth."

SALAZAR: Yes.

EISENBERG: Very cool. And your mother also was Miss Nude International?

(LAUGHTER)

SALAZAR: Yes, she was.

EISENBERG: All right. Fantastic. April, we are going to play a game called I-Tunes. It's very simple. Let me explain to you. So Jonathan Coulton here is going to sing a snippet of a song, but he's not going to sing the words that make up the title of the song, that is what you have to guess. And here is the big hint: every title of each song that we play ends in a long 'I' sound. Jonathan, do you want to do an example?

COULTON: Yes, I - so I might play something like this.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG)

COULTON: (Singing) This song ends in I. This song ends in I.

COULTON: Right, OK. So what was that?

That's "No Woman, No Cry" by Bob Marley.

EISENBERG: "No Woman, No Cry." And, of course, cry ends in a long I sound. Does that make sense to you?

SALAZAR: That makes sense.

EISENBERG: OK, so after you get the name of the song correct, we'll also ask you a bonus question about the song or the artist. You get one point for each correct answer, five points and you move on to our final, ultimate, challenge, showdown, jeopardy, final, elimination, final round at...

SALAZAR: OK.

EISENBERG: ...the end of the show.

(LAUGHTER)

SALAZAR: You're very optimistic.

EISENBERG: No, you're going to be great. You're going to be great. Jonathan, take it away.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG)

COULTON: (Singing) So bye, bye, something rhyming with I. Drove my Chevy to the levee but the levee was dry.

SALAZAR: That's Miss American Pie.

CHUNG: Very good.

SALAZAR: Bye, bye, Miss American Pie.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: "American Pie"? I like Miss American Pie, but that is a whole different...

SALAZAR: Fifteen.

COULTON: Miss Nude American Pie.

EISENBERG: ...pageant. Yeah.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: Yeah, so here's your follow-up question. Well done. Don McLean's "American Pie" is about a legendary plane crash that claimed the lives of Buddy Holly, the Big Bopper, and Richie Valens. What famed country singer gave up his seat so a sick Big Bopper could take the flight?

SALAZAR: I believe that was Waylon Jennings and he was a member of The Crickets.

EISENBERG: Oh my - look at you.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Showing off a little.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG)

COULTON: (Singing) Oh I'm on tonight and it sounds like I and I'm starting to feel like the attraction, the tension. Can't you feel it baby, this is perfection.

(LAUGHTER)

SALAZAR: I can't get it.

EISENBERG: OK. Do you know who sang it?

SALAZAR: No, I just can't even get the tune.

EISENBERG: All right.

COULTON: You're fired.

(LAUGHTER)

COULTON: That's "Hips Don't Lie" by Shakira.

EISENBERG: Shakira's birth country is actually mentioned in the lyrics of that song.

SALAZAR: Columbia.

EISENBERG: Oh yes, correct. All this time, I didn't know that, but you are right.

(APPLAUSE)

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG)

COULTON: (Singing) With this ever changing world in which we live in makes you give in and cry.

SALAZAR: (Singing) To live and let die.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: That is correct. Performed by Wings.

COULTON: Yes, Wings.

EISENBERG: Yes, I said the Wings earlier, they had a good laugh.

COULTON: And we took her to task for it, we certainly did.

EISENBERG: Yeah, well that's what we call them in Canada.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: We're more formal up there. So Weird Al Yankovic did a parody of "Live And Let Die" but he named it after a common comfort food, what is it?

SALAZAR: I'm trying to think of a comfort food that rhymes with I and...

COULTON: Good strategy

SALAZAR: ...and I'm just having a...

EISENBERG: Yeah, that's a good one.

SALAZAR: ...blank. There's ice cream.

EISENBERG: Yeah, don't - that's not cream I, you're right.

(LAUGHTER)

SALAZAR: I just can't get it.

EISENBERG: OK, that's fine, it's OK, that just means that you don't have Weird Al Yankovic albums which is - that's a point of pride.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: "Chicken Pot Pie."

SALAZAR: Ah.

EISENBERG: "Chicken Pot Pie."

COULTON: "Chicken Pot Pie."

EISENBERG: And then during the horn section, ba-ba-ba, what happens?

COULTON: Buck-buck-buck, buck-buck-buck, buck-buck-buck.

EISENBERG: It's amazing. Everyone has to get that YouTube going, it's hilarious.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG)

COULTON: (Singing) I don't want to make it tough, I just want to tell you that I've had enough. May sound crazy but it ain't no lie, baby, I, I, I, I, I.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: Got a little Coulton there at the end.

COULTON: [Unintelligible]

SALAZAR: I am stinking it up here, because I have no idea what that is.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: Wow.

COULTON: Oh the audience is shocked.

That is "Bye Bye Bye" by the N Sync.

EISENBERG: By the N Sync.

SALAZAR: Aah.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: OK, So "Bye Bye Bye" was actually N Sync, but it was written before Justin Timberlake went out and formed his own solo career. He broke up with a pop artist that inspired his later hit, "Cry Me A River." Who was that?

SALAZAR: She was the woman who wore matching denim with him, that was Britney Spears.

EISENBERG: Yes.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: That is funny that that is your little memory of Britney Spears. I have many others.

SALAZAR: And with all due respect to you, I call that the Canadian tuxedo.

(LAUGHTER)

COULTON: Yes. All due respect, Ophira.

EISENBERG: Yes. Sometimes people don't move on to the last round and you don't know why.

(LAUGHTER)

COULTON: There's just no explanation for it.

EISENBERG: There's no explanation. So - Oh yeah, six points! You are moving on.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: You are final spitfire round of ultimate showcase showdown, basically the last quiz. Thank you so much. So we'll bring you back at the end of the show for that. Thanks once again. What a great contestant. Our first contestant, April Salazar. Thank you.

(APPLAUSE)

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG "IKEA")

COULTON: (Singing) Long ago in days of yore, it all began with a god named Thor. There were Vikings and boats and some plans for a furniture store. It's not a bodega, it's not a mall, and they sell things for apartments smaller than mine. As if there were apartments smaller than mine.

(Singing) Ikea, just some oak and some pine and a handful of Norsemen. Ikea, selling furniture for college kids and divorced men. Everyone has a home, but if you don't' have a home, you can buy one there.

(APPLAUSE)

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