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5 Justices Agree: Insurance Penalty Considered A Tax
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5 Justices Agree: Insurance Penalty Considered A Tax

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5 Justices Agree: Insurance Penalty Considered A Tax

5 Justices Agree: Insurance Penalty Considered A Tax
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Renee Montagne and Linda Wertheimer has the latest on the Supreme Court's ruling on the Affordable Care Act. The court ruled that the law — with its "individual mandate," or requirement that virtually all Americans buy health insurance — is constitutional.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

In a landmark ruling, a major victory for President Obama. The Supreme Court has upheld the administration's health care law. The court ruled that the Affordable Care Act, with it's what's known as individual mandate as a requirement that virtually all Americans buy health insurance, is constitutional. The court's majority did not find the law constitutional under Congress' power to regulate interstate commerce...

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Instead, five justices agreed that the requirement to have health coverage should be considered a tax and that Congress does have the power to impose taxes. On the issue of Medicaid expansion, a majority of the court said Congress can expand Medicaid, but it cannot strip states of all their Medicaid funds if they fail to carry out the expansion.

MONTAGNE: The White House says President Obama will make an appearance later today to comment on the ruling. And we'll have more on that Supreme Court ruling coming up in the next hour of MORNING EDITION.

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