Power Outages Darken Many July 4 Celebrations

The lack of power in many areas hit hard by last week's storms put a damper on festivities. For some, the power may not return until this weekend. Some of the worst damage occurred in and around the nation's capital.

Copyright © 2012 NPR. For personal, noncommercial use only. See Terms of Use. For other uses, prior permission required.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

On the day after the Fourth, it's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

And I'm Linda Wertheimer.

It was especially easy for some Americans to see the fireworks last night. They had no competing source of light.

INSKEEP: Brilliant displays lit up cities like New York and Washington, but across Maryland, Virginia and New Jersey, about a quarter of a million homes still have no electricity.

WERTHEIMER: Some smaller celebrations had to be cancelled in Eastern states after last week's powerful storms, which caused havoc from Iowa to the East Coast.

INSKEEP: Officials blame the storms for at least 26 deaths, many from falling trees.

WERTHEIMER: In the Midwest and the Western U.S., dry, hot weather is still causing trouble. Officials in some cities in Indiana and Missouri did not want to take any chances with fireworks.

INSKEEP: Many communities in Colorado scrapped their displays as huge wildfires continued to burn.

Copyright © 2012 NPR. All rights reserved. No quotes from the materials contained herein may be used in any media without attribution to NPR. This transcript is provided for personal, noncommercial use only, pursuant to our Terms of Use. Any other use requires NPR's prior permission. Visit our permissions page for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by a contractor for NPR, and accuracy and availability may vary. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Please be aware that the authoritative record of NPR's programming is the audio.

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and terms of use, and will be moderated prior to posting. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.