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What's Carl This Time?

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What's Carl This Time?

What's Carl This Time?

What's Carl This Time?

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  • Transcript

A montage of Carl's greatest sound effects.

CARL KASELL: From NPR and WBEZ-Chicago, this is WAIT WAIT...DON'T TELL ME!, the NPR News quiz. I'm Carl Kasell, and here's your host, at the Chase Bank Auditorium, in downtown Chicago, Peter Sagal.

(APPLAUSE)

PETER SAGAL, HOST:

Thank you, Carl. Thanks everybody. We have got a special show for you all today. It's our second ever Listener Request show, in which we asked via Twitter and our blog, to tell us what you're favorite WAIT WAIT moments were from the last year or so.

KASELL: And since we're nothing if not obedient, and since thinking of our own ideas would delay our vacation, we're happy to serve it up.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: We're going to start this week with none other than Carl himself. Not Carl the serious news man, not Carl the judge and scorekeeper, not even Carl the skilled impressionist. No, what you folks want is Special Effects Carl.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: The man who can make any sound with just his mouth and pure will. Here he is, in July of 2010, introducing a really big sporting event.

KASELL: Goooooooooooooooooooooooal.

(APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: Whoa. That was impressive. That was well done.

(APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: But he wasn't done with the World Cup. Here he is just a week later.

KASELL: BZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZ.

(APPLAUSE)

AMY DICKINSON: Wow.

TOM BODETT: God, that's annoying.

SAGAL: That was Carl imitating a sound everybody, or at least World Cup soccer fans now know all too well. What is it?

JERUSHA KARRAKER: Oh, it's the South African trumpet.

SAGAL: Yes.

KARRAKER: I don't know how to say it.

SAGAL: Well that's OK; we'll give it to you. Its called the vuvuzela is what it's called.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

SAGAL: Very good, that's what it is.

(APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: And here's what a less charitable person might think of as Carl's sound effects Waterloo.

KASELL: Pyoo. Pyoo. Pyoo.

(LAUGHTER)

KASELL: Pyoo. Pyoo, pyoo, pyoo.

SAGAL: All right, Carl, repeat after me.

KASELL: OK.

SAGAL: Pyoo, pyoo, pyoo, pyoo.

BODETT: Yeah, don't you know, ray - pyoo, pyoo, pyoo, pyoo.

SAGAL: Come on, Carl.

BODETT: It's a universal ray gun.

KASELL: Pyoo, pyoo, pyoo, pyoo.

(LAUGHTER)

BODETT: That's closer.

KASELL: I just want to say that my ray gun noise wasn't bad; it's that the actual ray guns aren't good.

(LAUGHTER)

KASELL: Right, Carl.

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