Fountain Spouts Freedom From Heat In Philadelphia

It's been a very warm weekend for parts of the East Coast. Temperatures have climbed so high many cities warned residents to avoid strenuous activity and to stay hydrated. From member station WHYY, Elizabeth Fiedler reports on how Philadelphians are trying to beat the heat.

Copyright © 2012 NPR. For personal, noncommercial use only. See Terms of Use. For other uses, prior permission required.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. Good morning, I'm David Greene.

It's been pretty warm here on the East Coast the last few days. No, check that - it has been downright scorching. Temperatures have climbed so high many cities warned residents that they should avoid strenuous activity and stay hydrated.

From member station WHYY, Elizabeth Fiedler reports on how some are beating the heat in Philadelphia.

(SOUNDBITE OF WATER AND CHILDREN LAUGHING)

ELIZABETH FIEDLER, BYLINE: The heat doesn't seem to be bothering Elijah Snyder. Of course, he is sprinting back and forth through a big water fountain.

(SOUNDBITE OF WATER AND CHILDREN LAUGHING)

FIEDLER: The 5-year-old is surrounded by about a dozen other children in bathing-suits. While parents look on from nearby benches, the kids splash around in the jets of water at Philadelphia's Sister Cities Park.

Micah Straight isn't afraid to get wet while taking care of his three young daughters.

MICHAEL STRAIGHT: Yeah. That's OK, Hazel.

We're making sure they drink a lot of water and eat fruit. And we have the air conditioning running in the house.

FIEDLER: And who is this you're feeding grapes right now?

STRAIGHT: This is Louisa. She just had her first birthday last week. And she loves the water just like her big sisters.

FIEDLER: Kam Tavakkoli is from Virginia, says he's not crazy about the weather.

What's it like to be a tourist on vacation with two little kids when it's this hot?

KAM TAVAKKOLI: It's hard. But at the same time, it's rewarding when you find something like this right in the middle of the city. This is really good. This is a good idea I think for everyone.

FIEDLER: Even adults come to cool off. Christopher Dais gives in to temptation and ducks his head into a plume of water.

CHRISTOPHER DAIS: It's a hot day and I need to be cooled off, I did. That's why. Don't want to dehydrate yourself out here. Just stay cool and be calm.

FIEDLER: Down the street, leaving the library, one North Philadelphian says he has a plan to deal with the heat. He's going to pass the time in the air conditioning with the DVDs and book he just picked up.

For NPR News, I'm Elizabeth Fiedler in Philadelphia.

Copyright © 2012 NPR. All rights reserved. No quotes from the materials contained herein may be used in any media without attribution to NPR. This transcript is provided for personal, noncommercial use only, pursuant to our Terms of Use. Any other use requires NPR's prior permission. Visit our permissions page for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by a contractor for NPR, and accuracy and availability may vary. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Please be aware that the authoritative record of NPR's programming is the audio.

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and terms of use, and will be moderated prior to posting. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.

Support comes from: