Batman is No Match For Physics

  • Playlist
  • Download
  • Embed
    Embed <iframe src="http://www.npr.org/player/embed/156534680/156534698" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no">
  • Transcript

Batman may be able to save Gotham from villians but the rules of physics apply to him. Four British graduate students produced a paper called "Trajectory of a falling Batman." It says Batman could glide off a 500-foot building as he does in the 2005 movie but he'd hit the ground at a life-threatening 50 miles-per-hour.

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Linda Wertheimer. Batman may be able to save Gotham from super villains, but he's no match for physics. Four British graduate students produced a paper called "Trajectory of a Falling Batman." It says Batman could glide over a 500-foot building, as he does in the 2005 movie, "Batman Begins." But he'd hit the ground at a life-threatening 50 miles per hour - Dark Knight not rising. It's MORNING EDITION.

Copyright © 2012 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by a contractor for NPR, and accuracy and availability may vary. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Please be aware that the authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio.

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and terms of use, and will be moderated prior to posting. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.