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News In Spain, Greece Sends European Stocks Diving

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News In Spain, Greece Sends European Stocks Diving

Business

News In Spain, Greece Sends European Stocks Diving

News In Spain, Greece Sends European Stocks Diving

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/157217086/157217075" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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European stocks took a nosedive Monday as investors worried more than ever that Spain may need a full-fledged sovereign bailout. Two regions in Spain said they'll ask the country's central government for bailouts, and local Spanish media say several other regions could follow suit. And, of course, Greece remains in the center of the crisis in Europe.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Concern about Spanish debt is at the top of NPR's business news.

Not a great start to the trading week. The Dow fell 200 points in the early going today. European stocks also fell sharply because investors are more worried than ever that Spain may need a full-sovereign bailout. Now, Wall Street is making up some of the losses at this hour, but anxiety remains high after two regions in Spain said they'd be asking the country's central government for bailouts. Local Spanish media say several other regions could follow suit. It's not clear the central government can take it.

And, of course, Greece remains the center of the crisis in Europe. The prime minister said yesterday the country's in a great depression, comparing it to what the United States experienced in 1930s.

International leaders will be in Athens this week to push for more cuts, and to see whether Greece is meeting the terms of its bailout.

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