Swearing At Work Can Hold You Back, Survey Says

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A new survey by Harris Interactive shows 64 percent of bosses would think less of an employee who repeatedly swears, and 57 percent would be less likely to promote a constant curser. Among big cities in the U.S., workers in Washington, D.C., are most likely to swear on the job, followed by Denver, Chicago and Los Angeles.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Oh shoot. I guess it's already time for our last word in business, which is what the (beep).

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

So why are we talking dirty?

MONTAGNE: Because, Linda, a lot of people throw around bad words at work. But a new survey shows that may not be smart when it comes to your career opportunities.

The survey by Harris Interactive shows 64 percent of bosses would think less of an employee who repeatedly swears, and 57 percent said they'd be less likely to promote a constant curser.

WERTHEIMER: Well, son of a gun. But I guess there's no surprise there. Something else not surprising, among big cities in the U.S., workers right here in the nation's capital are the most likely to swear on the job.

MONTAGNE: And right behind Washington, D.C. is Denver, then Chicago and in fourth place, lots of cursers here in Los Angeles. I'll be darned.

(LAUGHTER)

WERTHEIMER: And that is the business news on MORNING EDITION, from NPR News.

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