Back Talk: Get Your Planes Right!

Tell Me More host Michel Martin digs through listeners' feedback. This week, the Chick-fil-A controversy lives on and we get schooled on which fighter planes actually appeared in the movie 'Top Gun.'

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MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

And now it's time for Back Talk. That's where we lift the curtain on what's happening in the TELL ME MORE blogosphere. Usually, our editor Ammad Omar, joins me, but somebody let him have the day off. Go figure. So I'll be shepherding this one.

First up, earlier this week, we had several conversations about the controversy over Chick-fil-A and those remarks by the president of that company expressing his opposition to same-sex marriage on religious grounds. We heard from Philadelphia Councilman James Kenney, ethicist Jack Marshall and Chicago Sun-Times columnist Mary Mitchell, and we heard from you.

Emmet Martin(ph) of Utica, New York sent in this email about Mary Mitchell's remarks. He said: "Her argument that preventing Chick-fil-A from opening, quote, 'hurts those that really need work,' unquote, is insulting. Discrimination, no matter who it affects, hurts. Anti-discrimination laws, many of which we were told would hurt the economy and create losses in jobs, were passed to create equal opportunity for millions of Americans," unquote.

Katie Watt(ph) of Spokane, Washington had another perspective. She wrote: "If the government cannot prevent companies from favoring homosexuality, then it should not ban companies from speaking against it," unquote.

And your letters and emails are still coming in, so we'll certainly keep our eyes on this story and see if there's more to say next week.

Finally, last week, we ran a segment with actor Anthony Mackie from the series, "Movies I've Seen One Million Times." It first aired on the NPR program WEEKENDS ON ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. Filmmakers, actors and writers have been telling us about the movies they can see over and over again.

And you probably remember Anthony Mackie from "The Hurt Locker" and this summer's "Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter." His film pick was "Top Gun."

ANTHONY MACKIE: I was about 11 or 12. I was really into airplanes the first time I saw "Top Gun," and it was on TV. And all I see are these F-16 Tomcats, like, falling into the frame.

(SOUNDBITE OF MOVIE, "TOP GUN")

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: You're vector O-9-O for bogie.

MACKIE: I was, like, this is amazing. I was completely just enthralled by it.

MARTIN: Well, the jets in Anthony Mackie's favorite movie are F-14s, not F-16s.

JOHN FALLEN: Come on, man. Get your facts straight. That was a wonderful story, but there was one inaccuracy that pilots around the world will recognize. The reader talked about F-16s, when, in fact, there were no F-16s in the movie. They were F-14 Tomcats, and the MiG aggressors were F-5E Tiger IIs painted black to look more menacing.

MARTIN: Thanks to John Fallen(ph) of Wrentham, Massachusetts for that correction, and we will be sure to let Mr. Mackie know.

And remember, with TELL ME MORE, the conversation never ends. To tell us more, you can visit us online at npr.org/TellMeMore. You can also find us on Twitter. Just look for tellmemorenpr.

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