Fresh Air Weekend: Feminists, Models, Roma Music

In About Face, former supermodels (including Carmen Dell'Orefice shown above) talk about what it's like to grow old in an industry that is obsessed with youth. i i

In About Face, former supermodels (including Carmen Dell'Orefice shown above) talk about what it's like to grow old in an industry that is obsessed with youth. Mark Mahaney/Greenfield-Sanders Studio/Courtesy HBO hide caption

itoggle caption Mark Mahaney/Greenfield-Sanders Studio/Courtesy HBO
In About Face, former supermodels (including Carmen Dell'Orefice shown above) talk about what it's like to grow old in an industry that is obsessed with youth.

In About Face, former supermodels (including Carmen Dell'Orefice shown above) talk about what it's like to grow old in an industry that is obsessed with youth.

Mark Mahaney/Greenfield-Sanders Studio/Courtesy HBO

Fresh Air Weekend highlights some of the best interviews and reviews from past weeks, and new program elements specially paced for weekends. Our weekend show emphasizes interviews with writers, filmmakers, actors, and musicians, and often includes excerpts from live in-studio concerts. This week:

Not A Feminist? Caitlin Moran Wants To Know Why Not: Moran believes that most women who don't want to be called feminists don't understand what feminism is. Her new book How to Be a Woman is a funny take on housework, high heels, body fat, abortion, marriage and, of course, Brazilian waxes.

Boban i Marko Markovic: Irresistible Party Music: The various music styles of Eastern Europe's Roma people, formerly known as gypsies, have become favorites with audiences around the world. Milo Miles says no group does a better job of blending tradition with innovation than the ensemble led by Boban Markovic and his son Marko.

Getting Old Is Hard, Even (And Especially) For Models: Supermodels open up about aging in a youth-obsessed industry in the HBO documentary About Face: The Supermodels Then and Now. "I really insisted that I not be retouched in Playboy," says Carol Alt. "... I'm 49 years old, and that was the point ... I let every bump and flaw show."

You can listen to the original interviews here:

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and terms of use, and will be moderated prior to posting. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.