7 Dead In Shooting At Sikh Temple

A shooting at a Sikh Temple in a suburb of Milwaukee has left seven people dead, including a suspect, officials say. A police officer is among the wounded. Latoya Dennis, a reporter for member station Milwaukee Public Radio, reports from Oak Creek, Wis.

Copyright © 2012 NPR. For personal, noncommercial use only. See Terms of Use. For other uses, prior permission required.

GUY RAZ, HOST:

It's WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Guy Raz.

Our cover story today: Could Asian-American voters swing the election? We'll have that in a few minutes, but first to some breaking news out of Wisconsin. A shooting this morning at a Sikh temple outside Milwaukee has left seven people dead. Among them the suspected gunman, shot by a police officer. Police are now treating the incident as a case of possible domestic terrorism. The mayor of Oak Creek, Steve Scaffidi, spoke out earlier.

MAYOR STEVE SCAFFIDI: The city of Oak Creek is outraged by the senseless act of violence that happened in our city today. And our thoughts and prayers go out to those victims.

RAZ: Joining us now from Oak Creek, Wisconsin, is Milwaukee Public Radio's Latoya Dennis. And, Latoya, you've been on the scene there for several hours. What can you tell us about what happened?

LATOYA DENNIS, BYLINE: Well, what we know is that around 10:25, there were several 911 calls about the gunman at the Sikh in Oak Creek just south of Milwaukee. There were reports of multiple gunmen, but police are saying now that they do believe it was only one gunman and that basically they're getting reports of multiple shooters just because people, you know, had different vantage points.

What they're saying right now is that they do believe it was that one shooter (unintelligible) it's still on the scene, and that's because they're trying to ensure that this area is safe and that there was (unintelligible) only the one gunman who was deceased who was shot by a police officer.

RAZ: What is the scene like there outside the temple?

DENNIS: Outside of the temple a little earlier, there may be 50 to 100, maybe even more members of this community who have come here, and they were all just waiting for answers and wondering, you know, how something like this could happen in a little city like Oak Creek, Wisconsin. But they're starting dissipate now. The crowd is starting to break up. And people seem sad, and they seem angry. And they're wondering why and how an - who would do something like this?

RAZ: Latoya, what do we know about the shooter or motives?

DENNIS: No motives are being talked about at this point. The police would not comment on the criminal investigation. What they are saying is that the FBI will take over and that they will be assisted with local police - by local police departments. And they're also saying that this is being treated as an incident of domestic terrorism.

RAZ: And what are we expected to find out more about what happened there?

DENNIS: Well, there'll be another press conference tomorrow morning at 10:00 a.m., and there will not be any updates until then. At this point, police say that crime scene technicians are coming in, and the medical examiner's office will come in and they'll get to notifying families.

RAZ: That's Milwaukee Public Radio's Latoya Dennis joining us from Oak Creek, Wisconsin, the site of that shooting at a Sikh temple. Latoya, thank you.

DENNIS: Thank you.

RAZ: And stay with NPR for the latest on that story.

Copyright © 2012 NPR. All rights reserved. No quotes from the materials contained herein may be used in any media without attribution to NPR. This transcript is provided for personal, noncommercial use only, pursuant to our Terms of Use. Any other use requires NPR's prior permission. Visit our permissions page for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by a contractor for NPR, and accuracy and availability may vary. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Please be aware that the authoritative record of NPR's programming is the audio.

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and terms of use, and will be moderated prior to posting. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.